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Here's a Ghanaian Hip-Hop Track For Staying On Your Grind

Kobi Onyame and Wanlov the Kubolor connect for "Still We Rise."

We've been following UK-based Ghanaian artist Kobi Onyame for minute now for his blend of West African influences with hip-hop.

In his new music video for "Still We Rise," which we're premiering here, Kobi links up another fellow Ghanaian, Wanlov the Kubolor of FOKN Bois fame, for a hazy trip through the mountains of Ghana.

Directed by both artists and captured by 6Miludo, the new video follows Kobi and Wanlov as they take a drive up the Aburi mountain in Ghana's Eastern Region.

"The inspiration behind the song was really recognising the ambition that I had within myself to achieve despite difficulties," mentions Kobi Onyame. "It's a universal concept. The song's actually pretty old but the message hasn't changed."

The track's a head-nodder highlighted by Kobi's heartfelt delivery and punctuated by Wanlov the Kubolor's incomparable, out-of-your-mind rapping style, which you can catch in the second verse.

"The first version was called 'We Rise' and it was actually Wanlov's verse that inspired adding the word 'Still" to the title," adds Kobi. "I decided to re work it with Wanlov for the new album. We've worked together before & love his authenticity. I think he was the perfect addition to the track & getting the message across to a people who recognise the chase for achievement and knowing that life's really a slow rise."

Watch our premiere of the music video for "Still We Rise" below. You can find the track on Kobi Onyame's Gold album.

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Photo by Eric Lafforgue/Art in All of Us/Corbis via Getty Images.

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