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Mankind. Photo by CJ Pixels.

This Is What the First Edition of the 'Hand-Forged in Kenya' Music Series Looked Like

'Hand-Forged in Kenya' kicked off to an epic start in Nairobi.

OkayAfrica, Bateleur Brewery and The Alchemist Bar joined forces to launch a new live music series, Hand-Forged in Kenya, that is focused on showcasing rising Kenyan talent to fans both locally and globally.

The first edition took place on Saturday, April 6, at The Alchemist Bar in Nairobi and it was a night to remember. Nairobians showed up in the hundreds to support their local talent and it was a beautiful scene to witness.


Songstress Ru.BY kicked off the night, which was curated by our Nairobi-based contributor Camille Storm, with an incredibly lively performance that included throwback Kenyan classics as well songs from her latest Hey There EP. Her captivating stage presence had many rushing to the dance floor in no time and she set the pace for the rest of the night.

Fox Elijah and his band, BLK GLD RPLK, later enthralled the audience with a mind-blowing hip-hop-meets-reggae fusion set. Alternative-pop duo Mankind shut the house down when they performed their hit single "Take and Go" for fans that had been yearning to see the duo play live for the first time.

It was difficult to leave the dance floor once Mix Master Lenny took over the decks—and he kept the party going 'til the early morning. What an epic start to what is looking to be a very exciting music series. All video and photography by Craig Mumo Kilili (CJ Pixels).

Check out how it all went down in the clip below!


Ru.BY. Photo by CJ Pixels.

Ru.BY. Photo by CJ Pixels.

Fox Elijah. Photo by CJ Pixels.

Fox Elijah. Photo by CJ Pixels.

Mankind. Photo by CJ Pixels.

Mankind. Photo by CJ Pixels.

Mankind. Photo by CJ Pixels.

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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Interview: 808x On Crafting Different Sounds For the Diverse Innanetwav Roster

808x, the in-house producer for South Africa's popular hip-hop collective/label Innanetwav, breaks down his working process with artists and the importance of energy.