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'Interwoven Histories' In London: An Exhibition Of Handcrafted Work By 4 Artists From Benin, Kenya & Nigeria

The October Gallery in London presents 'Interwoven Histories,' an exhibition of handcrafted mixed-media works by 4 African artists.

Throughout the month of November London's October Gallery is presenting Interwoven Histories, an exhibition centered around contemporary African artists who eschew popular artistic processes and technology in favor of more personal handwrought narratives. The monthlong exhibit brings together four award-winning artists from Benin, Nigeria and Kenya, who specialize in creating intricate handcrafted works using a variety of re-purposed materials. The most readily recognizable pieces in the show are those of Beninois mixed-media artist Romuald Hazoumé, whose masks and large-scale installations made from discarded petrol containers question modern iterations of economic slavery, oppression and exploitation in Africa. Other featured artists include Nigerian-American sculptor and video artist Adejoke Tugbiyele, who uses wire, natural fibers, fabric and wood to create sculptures that explore issues of queer sexuality, politics, and social justice while retaining elements of traditional Yoruba spiritualism; Kenyan metalwork artisan Naomi Wanjiku Gakunga, whose one-of-a-kind wall-mounted metal sheets pay homage to the grassroots community housing projects created in the 60's by the Mabati Women's Group; and Nigerian found object sculptor Nnenna Okore, who creates highly tactile sculptures with basic materials such as clay, newspaper, wax and rope in order to bring attention to the need for sustainable and environmentally friendly Nigerian communities. Click through our gallery above for a preview of recent and older works by the four selected artists.


Interwoven Histories is now on display at London's October Gallery and continues through November 29.

 

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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