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Johnny Cradle Remix Kanye West, Sade, James Blake & More In New EP

South African electro-dub trio Johnny Cradle premieres a 6-track remix EP featuring reworkds of Kanye West, James Blake and Sade.


In the summer of last year we were introduced to the smooth electro-bass single "uLate" from the self-coined "roots electro" trio known as Johnny Cradle. Hailing from Johannesburg, the group has recently been working on their album and prepping for a series of shows at this year's National Arts Festival. Consisting of songwriter/vocalist and producer Sakie, guitarist Chris and “beat-bot” Sisonke, Johnny Cradle creates bass-heavy tunes reminiscent of roots reggae while also taking inspiration from the heavy sound aesthetic of 90s-era rap. The result is a futuristic sound that blends electronic synths with electric Rhodes piano and digitized Xhosa sing-rap harmonies.

While in the process of working on their new album, Johnny Cradle produced a series of remixes that we're premiering here today. The 6-track EP features reworkings of songs by Kanye West, James Blake, Sade and Lianne La Havas. Johnny Cradle's remix of Kanye West's "New Slaves" is certainly a standout with its juxtaposition of Kanye's abrasive lyricism with Cradle's smooth electronic piano chords and signature electro-dub bass lines. Listen to Johnny Cradle's remix series project in its entirety below and, for more, revisit the video for the trio's 2014 summer single "uLate."

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(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

The 10 Best HHP Songs Ranked

On the second anniversary of HHP's passing, we rank 10 of the South African hip-hop legend's best songs.

Jabulani Tsambo, popularly known by his alias HHP, was a pivotal part of South African hip-hop. Renowned for trailblazing the motswako sub-genre in the early 2000s, the rapper sadly passed away on October 24th, 2018 after a long and much publicised bout with depression.

During his active years, which span two decades (from 1997 to 2018), he was instrumental in breaking barriers and bridging the gap between kwaito and hip-hop in SA, from the late 90s to early 2000s.

He became a household name in the 2000s as he spearheaded the motswako movement, propelling it to the mainstream and solidifying his legendary status in the process.

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