Audio

Kami Awori Reflect on Loss, Racism, and Police Brutality in the ‘Lunation’ EP

Kami Awori's 'Lunation' EP is both a tribute and contribution to the Black Lives Matter movement.

Kami Awori, formerly known as CaramelBrown, are a Paris-based duo comprised of pianist-turned-producer Karami and singer-songwriter Awori.


The Afro-R&B outfit’s latest release, the Lunation EP, reflects on the many deaths at the hands of American police in the past years, over a blend of West African samples and hazy beat work.

“It’s a project we're gonna offer as a free download because it’s both a tribute & a contribution to the Black Lives Matter movement,” Kami Awori tells Okayafrica. “Our songs were directly inspired by violent cases of police brutality. So naturally our goal is to share their political & spiritual messages with as many people as possible.”

Stream our premiere of the 3-song EP below and read Kami Awori’s Lunation 'manifesto' underneath.

"Lunation Manifesto

Aiyana Jones. Tamir Rice. Darnisha Harris. Trayvon Martin. Mike Brown. Tyisha Miller. Youths aged 7 to 19 years old, killed without valid reason by American police forces.

Nina Simone once said: “How can one be an artist and not reflect the times?” A statement that resonates louder every time a police brutality case comes up. And since time ceased healing wounds because the names keep multiplying, old scars can’t help reopening over & over again.

It’s in this vein that Lunation was created. A few moons away from the dawn of Black History Month, KAMI AWORI reflected on the notion of loss, or rather, the notion of a parent having lost their child under the watch of a justice system biased by racism. Lunation is a nostalgic tale of vulnerability, hope, desperation, spirituality and protest." —Kami Awori

 

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Watch Focalistic & Vigro Deep’s New Music Video For ‘Ke Star’

The 'Lockdown Level 1 anthem' has come to life through fire visuals.