Audio

The Melancholic Electronica Of Congolese/Austrian Producer Kimyan Law

Nineteen-year-old Congolese/Austrian musician Kimyan Law releases his debut LP, 'Couer Calme.'


Playing mostly self-made instruments, 19-year-old Congolese/Austrian electronic musician Kimyan Law creates aural songs that stimulate with their subtle emotional depth. Having been the victim of racism and personal strife, Law (real name Nico Mpunga) uses music as a means of coping. An exile from wartorn Congo living in Vienna, he immersed himself in the city's drum and bass community, got into Amon Tobin and James Blake, started fashioning his own musical devices out of raw materials and eventually connected with the founders of Blu Mar Ten Records. Last week, the label released Law's debut album Coeur Calme. Speaking with Vice, Law said, "To me, the album seems to be very melancholic and I think of it as some sort of ‘auditory childhood flashback.' It’s a collection of portraits. That’s all I can say." Featuring the tracks "Eclairage," a gray mesh of at times quick, at others restrained percussion and forlorn electronic effects, and "Run Ames (feat. Robert Manos)," an "Idioteque"-esque frenzy of beats and vocals, the record is not just technically complex but sensitive and evocative, too. Listen to the two songs below along with a 10-minute sample of Coeur Calme, find out more about the album here, and keep posted for more from Kimyan Law.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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