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Koko Clay Shares a Bittersweet Love Song to Her Congolese Heritage

The self-proclaimed "Nubian Disco Queen" premieres her new single "Motherland."

In her latest offering, the London-based artist explores her Congolese heritage over an addictive electro-R&B beat.

Koko Clay is a London-based artist of Congolese roots who stands out with an inventive sound that blends futuristic soul, retro pop and funk influences.

Originally from France, Koko made waves in the Parisian scene before moving to London to pursue her music career full time.

The self-proclaimed "Nubian Disco Queen" returns with a brand new single titled "Motherland" – a bittersweet love letter to her Congolese heritage. Full of unpredictable twists and turns, the song is a deftly-produced mix of stylish pop, afrobeats, house and gospel inspirations


"The song is a fictitious yet, realistic tale of a woman, who grew up in the streets of Kinshasa, the Congolese capital, in contrast to my own personal experience as a woman of Congolese descent, who grew up in France, proud of my roots and heritage," Koko Clay tellsOkayAfrica.

"Motherland" also shows off Koko's prowess as a fierce triple threat that writes, produces and sings all her music. With its hard-hitting beat and passionately-sung lyrics, this song is enough for repeated listens.

Listen to our premiere of "Motherland" by Koko Clay below.


Film
(Youtube)

10 African Films That Deal With Protest Culture & History

African countries have a long history of protests and demonstrations against forces of oppression, and this has been represented significantly in cinema.

Around the world, Nigerians in the diaspora have picked up the mantle of protesting peacefully against police brutality and violence. These gatherings are a direct extension of the nationwide protests that were brought to a tragic halt in Lagos after soldiers of the Nigerian army fired guns at peaceful protesters at the Lekki tollgate venue.

African countries have a long history of protests and demonstrations against forces of oppression and this has been represented significantly in cinema. This list, while not an exhaustive one, attempts to contextualize this rich cinematic history, tracing the complex and diverse ways that protest culture have been reflected in African film. From influential classics that are now considered required viewing to fascinating portraits of individual resistance, these films are proof that the struggle continues, regardless.

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