News Brief
L-Tido, Maggz and Sean Pages earlier this year. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

L-Tido Breaks Down What Exactly Happened to Glitz Gang in His New Album ‘16’

L-Tido releases his most introspective album to date.

South African rapper L-Tido dropped a new album today, titled 16. The project is his first in five years (his sophomore All of Me came out in 2013).

16 is undoubtedly Tido's most introspective album to date. While on All of Me, the MC had a few personal songs, like "Problems" and "Unbreakable," on 16, he has more of those types of songs, in which he's speaking about issues that have been in his mind.

He speaks on his thoughts on the ever-changing hip-hop scene on the song "Letter To The Game," in which he personifies hip-hop. He raps about DJs who only break their songs, politicians using hip-hop for their agendas, OGs who are failing to evolve… issa lot.

But one song that sticks out is the second last track on the 13-track album, "Glitz Gang Forever." In the song, Tido breaks down the story of what happened between him, Maggz, Sean Pages and Morale, who are collectively known as Glitz Gang (formerly Glitterati).

Read: The Story of How Pro Gave AKA & IV League Their Biggest Break

Glitz Gang was one of the groups that were instrumental in shaping what South African hip-hop sounds like today. They were on that trap shit before it became cool this side of the Equator.

Glitz Gang only released a few singles in the late 2000s, but never got to release an album.


Maggz, L-Tido and Sean Pages have worked on numerous collaborations since then, but Morale has been out of the picture. In "Glitz Gang Forever," Tido raps:

"Finally crossed over; streets to the fame/ They waited for the album, release never came/ But instead we dropped solos, went against the grain/ More success we got, we drifted apart/ [?] we lost the plot/ that linked us from the start/ Egos got inflated, jealousy invaded/ I guess that's a diplomatic way that I can say it/ Pages left the crew, Morale left the crew/ We disintegrated; foes out the blue."

Tido goes onto mention an interview Morale did with Vuzu in which he said undesirable things about him.

In the song, while telling the story of how Glitz Gang came up, Tido makes reference to his beef with AKA, which has since been squashed. "08, 09 had the streets locked/ "Amaretto" dropped, Kiernan took some cheap shots/ Then I.V. League-Glitz Gang beef popped/ Fist fights, gun shots, couple teeth knocked."

"Glitz Gang Forever" is an emotional song, which tells the story of friendship and growing apart. Tido says in the song that he hasn't spoken to Morale in three years, but it's still all love. "As far as Maggz and Sean Pages go, they my brothers for life," he says in a monologue towards the end of the song. And the piano keys… someone is chopping onions next to me. 😢

Sean Pages and Maggz also make appearances on 16, alongside the likes of AKA, Cassper Nyovest, Darne, Nadia Nakai, Gemini Major and a few others. The album features the singles "I'm Back" and "Zilele." 16 is L-Tido's first album released under a major label, Universal Music, after being the face of independence his whole career.

Listen to 16 below or download it here.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.