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Watch Lucille Slade Perform an Acoustic Version of Her Latest Single ‘Khuluma Nami’

Watch Lucille Slade perform her single 'Khuluma Nami' on The Wooden Stool.

Lucille Slade's latest single "Khuluma Nami" takes on a new form in her acoustic performance on the YouTube series The Wooden Stool.


The performance places the singer's voice in the center, as the song is stripped of the percussion and almost all the instrumentation heard on the recorded version. Lucille Slade has a wide voice that doesn't need any effects and can stand on its own without the aid of instrumentals.

The singer is one of the most consistent South African musicians on the come-up, from creating exciting series that showcase her music, such as the covers of popular South African songs she has been releasing in the last few years. She released her debut EP Scratch the Surface in 2018 and the video single "Velvet" last year. She also appeared on Stogie T's last two projects Honey and Pain (2018) and The Empire of Sheep (2019).

"Khuluma Nami" is a new single from the singer which she released in February. In the song, she laments about unrequited love to her partner. She sings, "Is it asking way too much to be what I remember? Baby, do you remember? Is there way too much water under this bridge?"

The Wooden Stool is a new YouTube series that showcases great artists through a series of acoustic performances—artists like Refi, Mvrco Polo and Denise Zimba among others have all showcased their songs on the platform.

Watch Lucille Slade's performance of "Khuluma Nami" below and stream the song underneath:

youtu.be



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Six Things History Will Remember Kenneth Kaunda For

News of Kenneth David Kaunda's passing, at age 97, has reverberated across the globe. Kaunda, affectionately known as KK, was Zambia's first President from 1964 to 1991.

Following Nelson Mandela's passing in December 2013, Kenneth Kaunda became Africa's last standing hero. Now with his passing on Thursday, June 17 — after being admitted to the Maina Soko Military Hospital in Lusaka earlier in the week — this signals the end of Africa's liberation history chapter.

It is tempting to make saints out of the departed. The former Zambian struggle hero did many great things. He was, after all, one of the giants of the continent's struggle against colonialism. Ultimately however, he was a human being. And as with all humans, he lived a complicated and colourful life.

Here are six facts you might not have known about him.

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