Manthe Ribane & Okzharp. Photo: Chris Saunders.

Defying Borders, Genres and Mediums: The Multimedia World of Manthe Ribane, Okzharp & Chris Saunders

The three artists unveil an album, short film, installation and tour around their debut full-length, Closer Apart.

Why settle for a genre or a medium when there's an entire world of creativity to draw from?

That's a defining ethos of the collaboration between Manthe Ribane, Okzharp, and Chris Saunders. Through music, performance art, video, and more, the three pull from anywhere that could possibly help create the world they're trying to build.

"What's most important is creating an experience with the different mediums that we showcase," says Ribane, a South African artist who handles vocal and performance duties.

Closer Apart, their first full length album on Hyperdub Records, finds them in progressive form, with London's Okzharp on production and Ribane singing, occasionally slipping into the Sepedi language. It's a clear vision—an individualistic project that avoids identifying too closely with any specific genre or scene, but the stark electronic beats and chanted lyrics do expose their respective roots.


Their output goes far beyond music, including a new residency in Nirox Sculpture Park at the Cradle Of Humankind, located outside Johannesburg; a short film featuring a crisp array of changing colors and scenery; and a multimedia installation in London that includes a lighting system designed specifically for it. Each manifestation includes paintings by Jonathan Freemantle, music from the album, and dancing—both previously recorded and performed live—all of which is altered a bit each time.

Every piece is developed in tandem. They repurpose the choreography, video, singing, and production as they go, using a sketch of a game plan and chunks of previously finished material, and improvise from there. This method is a deeply rooted aspect of all their work together. "That's kind of a guiding principle for us," explains Okzharp, also known as Gervase Gordon. "We like to be prepared, but in the moment you have to trust your intuition to go off plan and improvise. That's how you get the best results in everything." The music wasn't even finished when they started the film, and they worked with demos for the album. "We had to choose which songs we would use in the film and hoped that Hyperdub liked them as well," laughs Okzharp. "Luckily everything in the film made it onto the album."

The collaboration between the three started with a short film called Ghost Diamond. Saunders had brought Okzharp on to do music for the film, and then they brought Ribane on as a dancer. Saunders wanted to go through a list of dancers and Ribane was the first he had mentioned. "I wasn't aware of her beforehand, but I was like we don't need a list, let's just approach her," Okzharp recalls of her immediate impact. Pretty soon after the film they released their first EP together and started touring with Saunders doing live video. "The beginning seed for this project was a film and the music came out of that," says Ribane. "It shows the different mediums that we want to explore."


Chris Saunders is a South African photographer and filmmaker who often works with local dancers and released a book on a style called pantsula. Okzharp has family in South Africa but was raised in the UK and was previously a part of the British electronic dance music group LV. As he got older and started making friends beyond his family, he started traveling to Africa more frequently, engaging with the music there. Ribane grew up in Soweto, a township of Johannesburg, and has been creating all her life. She first performed for Nelson Mandela at 8 years old, toured with Die Antwoord as a backup dancer a few ago, and recently created outfits for Black Panther.


While Ghost Diamond was very focused on Johannesburg, using the city as a character in itself, Closer Apart and the accompanying projects are somewhat region-less. Ribane performs in a collection of settings, with themes based on color, her makeup and outfits matching each space. They range from natural scenery, to undefinable built environments, with the paintings making stealthy appearances in the background. Musically, the project is even more slippery, primarily concerned with vibe and emotion over genre or location. "Music is a global language, it's within the experience of listening to the music and how you define that moment," explains Ribane. "For me, it's just connecting with different borders of the world, not just South Africa or the UK. It's beyond us, beyond the world even."



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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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Nudes cover artwork.

You Need to Listen to Moonchild Sanelly's New EP, 'Nüdes'

The buzzing South African singer breaks down her provocative & empowering new 4-song EP.

South Africa's Moonchild Sanelly returns with the Nüdes EP.

The highly-buzzing SA artist's latest project sees her expanding on her own brand of 'electro-pop-ghetto-funk' as she runs through four standout tracks that revolve around her outspoken stance on female sexual empowerment and more.

Nüdes features two previously heard hits from Moonchild Sanelly—the anti-fuck boy synth anthem "F-Boyz" and gqom-laced banger "Weh Mameh." It also includes two previously unreleased tracks in "Come Correct" and "Boys & Girls."

This year saw Moonchild Sanelly break charts and dance floors in South Africa and across the globe with her own sounds, as well as her big collaborations with Damon Albarn for Africa Express and Beyoncé's Lion King: The Gift album.

We talked to Moonchild below about the new EP, during which she broke down all of the songs and even told us how she ended up on the Beyoncé album.

Read our conversation below.

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Screenshot from the upcoming film Warriors of a Beautiful Game

In Conversation: Pelé's Daughter is Making a Documentary About Women's Soccer Around the World

In this exclusive interview, Kely Nascimento-DeLuca shares the story behind filming Warriors of a Beautiful Game in Tanzania, Brazil and other countries.

It may surprise you to know that women's soccer was illegal in Brazil until 1981. And in the UK until 1971. And in Germany until 1970. You may have read that Sudan made its first-ever women's league earlier this year. Whatever the case, women and soccer have always had a rocky relationship.

It wasn't what women wanted. It certainly wasn't what they needed. However, society had its own ideas and placed obstacle after obstacle in front of women to keep ladies from playing the game. Just this year the US national team has shown the world that women can be international champions in the sport and not get paid fairly compared to their male counterparts who lose.

Kely Nascimento-DeLuca is looking to change that. As the daughter of international soccer legend Pelé, she is no stranger to the game. Growing up surrounded by the sport, she was actually unaware of the experiences women around the world were having with it. It was only recently that she discovered the hardships around women in soccer and how much it mirrored women's rights more generally.

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Convener of "#Revolution Now" Omoyele Sowore speaks during his arraignment for charges against the government at the Federal High Court in Abuja, on September 30, 2019. (Photo by KOLA SULAIMON/AFP via Getty Images)

Nigerian Activist, Omoyele Sowore, Re-Arrested Just Hours After Being Released on Bail

Sowore, the organizer of Nigeria's #RevolutionNow protests, was detained by armed officers, once again, in court on Friday.

Omoyele Sowore, the Nigerian human rights activist and former presidential candidate who has spent over four months in jail under dubious charges, was re-arrested today in Lagos while appearing in court.

The journalist and founder of New York-based publication Sahara Reporters, had been released on bail the day before. He was arrested following his organization of nationwide #RevolutionNow protests in August. Since then, Sowore has remained in custody on what are said to be trumped-up charges, including treason, money laundering and stalking the president.

He appeared in court once again on Friday after being released on bail in federal court the previous day. During his appearance, Sowore was again taken into custody by Nigerian authorities.

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