News Brief

Hear DJ Maphorisa's Song For Nelson Mandela's 100th Birthday

"Dance Like Mandela" features Moonchild, Stilo Magolide, Mlindo The Vocalist & DJ Sbucardo and samples Drake.

Today marks the 100th birthday of Nelson Mandela.

To celebrate the occasion, South African producer DJ Maphorisa—the man behind many a hit for the likes of Drake, Kwesta, Shekhinah and others—is sharing the new gqom-leaning track "Dance Like Mandela."

Maphorisa called up a strong list of collaborators to help out on this new song for Mandela. Moonchild, who shines on bangers like "Midnight Starring" and "Makhe," adds her vocals to the track. Boyzn Bucks member and rapper Stilo Magolide also shows up to add his own flavor alongside Mlindo The Vocalist and DJ Sbucardo.

You can also hear snippets of "Madiba Riddim," the track from Drake's More Life sampled in this new one.


Maphorisa writes that he considers Mandela "one of the most important political activists of our time and a symbol of peaceful resistance on behalf of human rights."

"To celebrate his birthday I teamed up with REPRESENT on #DANCELIKEMANDELA—a campaign that wants to inspire young people all over the world to become a catalyst for social change through music and dance," DJ Maphorisa explains. "The track is a tribute to Nelson Mandela... [the] dancer. He was famous for getting up in any setting, whether on the political campaign trail, at the UN, or at a party, with his iconic Madiba Shuffle. He famously stated, 'It is music and dancing that make me at peace with the world.'"

Listen to and download "Dance Like Mandela" below. If you're in NYC, catch DJ Maphorisa at our Mzansi Heat and Naija Beats concert at Lincoln Center on August 2 alongside Yemi Alade and DJ Tunez.







Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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