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In Photos: Migos' Culture Tour in Johannesburg

ATL trio Migos' Culture Tour had two South African stops–in Durban on Friday and Johannesburg on Saturday.

We attended the Joburg leg of the tour, and the group didn't disappoint, although the event itself was unacceptably disorganized. South African rappers Riky Rick and Nasty C gave great performances, especially the latter.


AKA was announced on stage, but after more than two hours of him not showing up, fans were left waiting with no activity at all–just a random playlist that had repeated songs.



Other South Africans acts on the bill, such as Gigi Lamayne and L'vovo Derrango did not get to perform.

Mabala Noise, the company which organized the event, recently released a statement clarifying the inconvenience:

"Just after 7pm on Saturday evening a massive storm descended on Johannesburg significantly impacting some of the access control points and the electronic accreditation systems.

In the best interests of public safety, the VOC made the decision to pause the live performances until such time as the access points were operating effectively and the safety of patrons could be assured. The safety of the fans was paramount. The time taken to ensure that the event could continue safely caused the delay to the concert schedule and timings had to be adjusted accordingly.

All booked South African artists were backstage and made aware of the situation. Migos went on stage at their scheduled time slot and performed their full set."

But the Migos performance was worth the wait. The cool kids of Joburg went wild to the group's hits–from their early material such as "Hannah Montana" all the way to recent songs like "T-Shirt" and "Get Right Witcha" among others.

Tall A$$ Mo and Kanyi Mbau were the hosts for the night.

Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Nasty C

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo MKhabela.

Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

All photography by Sabelo Mkhabela, who's lit on Instagram: @sabzamk.

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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