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The Mo Ibrahim Foundation Is Looking For You To Submit Photos Of African Cities

Enter the Mo Ibrahim Foundation's 'Snapping Cities' photo contest for a chance to appear in an exhibit at the Ibrahim Forum in Accra.


The Mo Ibrahim Foundation, founded in 2006 by Sudanese mobile communications mogul Mo Ibrahim to support good governance and exceptional leadership on the continent, has launched a competition open to emerging photographers of all ages and skill levels. Their Snapping Cities competition is an opportunity for anyone interested in photography to show off a glimpse of urban life across the continent. Winning photographs will be shown at the fifth annual Ibrahim Forum gathering of high level leaders and representatives across the continent. This year's forum, which will focus its discussion on "African Cities," is set to take place in Accra in November. Here’s more on what the foundation is looking for in photo submissions:

“Snapping Cities is an opportunity for photographers of all abilities and ages, to capture through their own lenses, urban life in Africa. The Mo Ibrahim Foundation (MIF) is seeking images that capture inspiring ways of tackling urban challenges in African cities. This may be modern innovation or a basic adaptation of day-to-day life. The theme is open to your personal interpretation but we’re looking for beautiful, inspiring and original photographs. A selection of the best photographs will be displayed at the 2014 Ibrahim Forum on African Cities in Accra, Ghana, in November, with prizes for the top three entries.”

The Mo Ibrahim Foundation secretariat will select winners for the top three prizes. In addition to being featured in an exhibition at the Forum, selected photographs will be displayed on the MIF website. Cash prizes will also be awarded (first place will receive $500; second place $200; third place $100). The deadline to enter is October 10th at 5PM.

>>>Submit Your Photo + Find Out More Details On The Snapping Cities Contest Here

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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