Photos
Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

This Is What Happens When You Strip Lagos of Its Vibrant Color

"Monochrome Lagos," an ongoing project of photographer Logor Oluwamuyiwa, challenges us to see his buzzing city in a different light.

Logor Oluwamuyiwa completely strips a place of its color. The photographer's ongoing project, Monochrome Lagos, forces the viewer to pay close attention to the city's details in the absence of a critical component.

His visual diary that he began in 2013 is a study of the very soul of Lagos—and it's refreshing and raw.
He weaves in and out of his city's streets, capturing its edifices, people and everyday occurrences. His poignant point of view shines through his work, as well as his passion as he subtly dissects Lagos' social divide and identity.


In color, the city heightens the senses; but in black, white and gray, it offers him endless narratives. His photographs are supported by prose often written "spur of the moment" directly from his "stream of consciousness." Without formal training in the field of photography, Logor teaches himself on the job as he produces his work.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Where Nigeria's most populous city is frenetic, dynamic, and home to a kaleidoscope of jarring colors, Oluwamuyiwa asks his viewer to connect with it through lines, patterns, forms and portraits. "It's a question, 'What if we tried this?' With a very specific curation of lines, patterns, forms," he ponders. "If you reduce the colors, will you be able to see the lines and forms and appreciate the patterns?"

Oluwamuyiwa wants to spark new conversations, shock and inspire through his work. "How can I observe this human carnival around me and take away from it and turn it back to the world? I want to use myself as a conduit between observing the world and responding the world with my profession," he says. "That's my philosophy."

His "pseudo-curriculum" is the work of famous street photographers: Robert Frank, Garry Winogrand and Eugene Atget. He sees Lagos like they surveyed New York City and Paris.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Oluwamuyiwa says he's armed with a social media account, a DSLR camera, and a website he's using to create an archive he hopes will culminate in 10 years. It will serve as a way to track his city's ever changing make-up. It's very evident the longevity he seeks is possible as people resonate with his work. It's been on display in his city's Rele Gallery, Omenka Gallery, photo festivals, and Open Range Exhibition. Abroad, he's been featured in the Beaux Arts Festival; cities like Cape Town, London and Hamburg. Oluwamuyiwa has his sights set on showing in museums in the U.S. and other African nations like Mali's photo festival. Already having filled a couple hard drives full of photography, he will surely conquer "every photography conversation in the world."

To answer his question, Lagos does not lose its energy when one tones down its color. I would argue it is further amplified.

Take a look at a selection of Logor Oluwamuyiwa's photos from his Monochrome Lagos project below.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Photo by Logor Oluwamuyiwa.

Interview

This Compilation Shines a Light On East African Underground Music

We talk to a few of the artists featured on the Music For the Eagles compilation from Uganda's Nyege Nyege.

Nyege Nyege, a label in Kampala, Uganda is channelling the confidence brimming over a whole continent. Africa is no longer the future. For dance music, its time is right now.

Music For the Eagles is a compilation released in conjunction with Soundcloud to showcase the best new acts that East Africa has to offer outside the mainstream. A new wave of artists firmly blasting non-conformist energy for you to spasm to. Music that takes you places. Otim Alpha's high BPM wedding frenzy of incessant rasping vocals accompanied by feverous violin will have you clawing the walls to oblivion. Anti Vairas' dancehall from a battleship with super galactic intentions doesn't even break a sweat as it ruins you. FLO's beautiful sirens call, is a skittish and detuned nursery rhyme that hints at a yearning for love but reveals something far more unnerving. Ecko Bazz's tough spiralling vocal over sub-bass and devil trap energy is an anthem that can only be bewailed. And Kidane Fighter's tune is more trance-like prayer. These are only some of the highlights for you to shake it out to.

We got to chat with a few of the artists featured on the Music For the Eagles compilation as they took a break from the studio below.

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