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A 4-Year-Old Black Girl Takes Off Into Space In Muzi’s Music Video for ‘Zulu Skywalker’

Watch Muzi's latest music video for 'Zulu Skywalker.'

South African electronic music artist Muzi just released the visuals for his song "Zulu Skywalker" from his stellar debut album Afrovision. The animated video was created by Durban-based rapper and graphic designer ByLwansta. It tells the story of a 4-year-old girl, whose name is Ziphozethu. She takes off into space, in a video that is the first chapter of a story that is going to be continued.


"There is a substory that flows throughout Afrovision about African space travel," says Muzi. "The scientific/technologic meets spiritual way. 'Zulu Skywalker,' 'Channel Blak' and 'Bantu Space Odyssey' are all inspired by that. My niece loves cartoons but there's rarely any cartoon that looks like her hence this video. She's into science, astrology and technology, just like I was when I was little.

"This video is a first in a series of videos where I'll further be exploring the concept of space and of young black girls being interested in more than just the monolithic expressions we normally see in our traditional and commercial media."

Watch the video for "Zulu Skywalker" below, and revisit our interview with Muzi about his album Afrovision, here.


Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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