Photos

Prêt-À-Poundo: Mozambique Fashion Week's Young Designers [Day 1]

Young Fashion Designers Competition at the Mozambique Fashion Week 2012.


*Designer Amira Amin. All photos by SDR Photo.

Mozambique Fashion Week (MFW) kicked off on Dec. 7th — showcasing local, regional and international designers. For the 8th edition of the biggest national fashion event, the two first days were dedicated to young designers and were marked by an innovative contest called "Wear Me at Standard Bank" (a sponsor and partner of MFW since 2011). Stylist Sarah Tie said: "Standard Bank initiative is optimal  because of the chance it offers the public the choice between pieces that serve as uniform for their employees."

*Deria Judas

The winner will get the opportunity to meet and shadow the award-winning designer David Tlale. No need for introduction, the South African is unquestionably one of the most creative African designers and will be a great mentor for an emergent designer.

*Agira Mualeite

The contest offered an extraordinary blend of young designers. MFW successfully started on Day 1 with Amira Amin, Agira Mualeite, Meistre Guigui, Enesda Joao, Ana Pene, Ferreira Nhampulo, Ana Sitoe, Armando Cuna, Kutsura, Deria Judas and Aura Guimaraes. Some of them already distinguish themselves by their talent, creativity, levels of boldness and a willingness to take risks. These are few pictures of Day 1.

*Kutsura

*Armando Cuna

*Ferreira Nhampulo

*Amira Amin

*Meistre Guigui

*Ana Pene

*Entertainment during the show

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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