Audio

Nguzunguzu's Zouk-Based 'Perfect Lullaby Vol. II' Mix

Download LA duo Nguzunguzu's zouk-based Perfect Lullaby Vol. II mixtape.


Before the whole zouk bass thing, L.A. production duo Nguzunguzu (Daniel Pineda and Asma Maroof) were blending Angolan kizomba and tarraxo beats with R&B in standout mixes like 2011's Perfect Lullaby. The duo continue that tradition in their recently dropped Perfect Lullaby Vol. II, which features young producers like Angola/Portugal's Bison (whose EP we recently premiered) alongside zouk/kizomba reworks of Rihanna, Future, Cassie, Mariah Carey and more. Download Nguzunguzu's Perfect Lullaby Vol. II mix below and get the full visual experience over at DIS magazine.

TRACKLIST

Dj Fofuxo & Dj Pausas vs. Yuki Koshimoto – Tarracho Exxelentt/ New Moon (MA edit)

Dj Lil Thug vs. Aaliyah – Hot tarraxa/ Dont think they know (MA edit)

Dj N.k – Não Chora Mais Não

Dj Cratera – My girl. My Music

Cassie – Diced Pineapples (NGUZU kizomba remix)

Marbonu – Pura Melodia

Dj tiba – Tarracha Poderoza 2009

Dj Dadifox vs. Ciara – Tarraxo Dueces (MA edit)

Usher Ft. Rick Ross – Let Me See (M&N PRO REMIX)

Nova & Jory – La Noche Perfecta

Chris Brown – Another Round (Phraze zouk remix)

Dj Malcolm – 4 ev

Marques Houston- Clubbin Zouk mix (by N.G productions)

Dj NigGa fox vs. Kelela- Tarraxo HUMBÃ√/ The High (MA edit)

Dj Rick & Dj Lil thug – Saudade Eterna

Dj Salez – Tarracha di nhOs

Dj Bison – Tarraxo Indiano

T Pain – I cant believe it (Peejay Zouk fusion remix)

Dj Malcolm – 14 malo

Rihanna – Diamonds (Kizomba remix by MalcriadoBeats)

Mariah Carey – Touch my Body (Zouk remix by Phraze)

Future – Honest (Zouk remix by Phraze & StyloBeatz)

DJ Joyce Gomes & Revolucion – Choro do Corno

Dj Xocolath – My Song

Mary J Blige – Be without you (NA remix)

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.