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Listen to K.O., Omen, Lee Kasumba, DJ Azuhl and More Pay Tribute to Pro In An Episode of ‘SA Hip-Hop Fix’

Listen to Pro's peers pay tribute to the rapper who died last week.

Tributes are still pouring in for the South African hip-hop legend Pro, who died last week Thursday. SA Hip Hop Fix, the hip-hop podcast hosted by Cape Town-based legendary DJ trio Beat Bangaz, released a 'ProKid Special' episode last night.


In the episode, several of Pro's peers— radio show host Lee Kasumba, Skwattakamp member Shugasmakx, fellow rapper Mr Selwyn, co-founder of the clothing label Loxion Kulca, Wandi Nzimande, and more—each share endearing words about what type of person and artist Pro was. Some share anecdotes of Pro in his prime. For instance, Omen, who produced a lot of Pro's hits from his classic debut album Heads & Tales, remembers an event they performed in.

"Kwaito was the order o f the day," he says, "and uMzekezeke had just performed. And the crowd was lit, and we were up next, you can imagine… David versus Goliath situation. But I tell you, man. When we came on… I used to do this thing, when Pro raps, every fourth line is a punchline, so I would kill the music, and he would just hit it. The crowd went berserk. I've never seen people go nuts like that." K.O. remembers Pro showing him love during the launch of his hit "CaraCara."

Some memorable songs by Pro such as "Uthini Ngo Pro?," "Soweto," "Budget Speech," "Soweto," "Ghetto Science," "Syeke Ngey'ndaba" (by Young Nations), and more, are played to remind you what a powerhouse Pro was. There's also a spectacular freestyle in which ProVerb and Pro freestyle over Jay-Z's "Encore." How monumental!

Listen to the episode below:

Audio
(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images)

The 10 Best HHP Songs Ranked

On the second anniversary of HHP's passing, we rank 10 of the South African hip-hop legend's best songs.

Jabulani Tsambo, popularly known by his alias HHP, was a pivotal part of South African hip-hop. Renowned for trailblazing the motswako sub-genre in the early 2000s, the rapper sadly passed away on October 24th, 2018 after a long and much publicised bout with depression.

During his active years, which span two decades (from 1997 to 2018), he was instrumental in breaking barriers and bridging the gap between kwaito and hip-hop in SA, from the late 90s to early 2000s.

He became a household name in the 2000s as he spearheaded the motswako movement, propelling it to the mainstream and solidifying his legendary status in the process.

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