News Brief

Samthing Soweto. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Samthing Soweto and Makhafula Vilakazi’s New Song ‘Omama Bomthandazo’ is a Need

Samthing Soweto and Makhafula Vilakazi's latest song is a Women's Month special.

"Abamama Bomthandazo" is a song by Samthing Soweto and poet Makhafula Vilakazi, which the artists released to commemorate Women's Day (August 9) and Women's Month (August) in South Africa.


Samthing Soweto, one of the best to ever to do it, sings about women who put prayer before everything, and who pray for us as we go about life. Makhafula's poem starts by acknowledging how hard women work—from waking up early in the morning and ensuring everything is in order before they go about their hustle.

He speaks of women's abilities to survive and fend for their families. He cleverly and subtly compares women to men. The latter are stereotypically known for their flashy, materialistic and hedonistic ways. Women, however, are "klevas" just like the men, the difference is they hustle for the benefit of those they care:

"Ak' nakleva egqok' iCarvela, ikleva ez'gqok' iphinifa netshalo, zithwala abazukulu emqolo, zine stress segrocer, az'phath' amatlam i'kleva, z'phatha ama dummy nama nap'keni, azinkawzi…"

You might want to enroll for those IsiZulu classes to appreciate the two men's penmanship.

As a nod to the church theme, the song's hook is delivered in gospel music style atop screaming keys—the song will take you straight to church.

Listen to "Abomama Bomthandazo" below:

Samthing Soweto - Omama Bomthandazo (feat. Makhafula Vilakazi) www.youtube.com



Music
Photo courtesy of AYLØ.

Interview: AYLØ Bridges His Music & Universe In the 'Clairsentience' EP

The Nigerian artist talks about trusting your gut feelings, remedying imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do.

AYLØ's evolution as an artist has led him to view sensitivity as a gift. As the alté soundscape in the Nigerian scene gains significant traction, his laser focus cuts through the tempting smokescreen of commercial success. AYLØ doesn't make music out of need or habit. It all boils down to the power of feeling. "I know how I can inspire people when I make music, and how music inspires me. Now it's more about the message."

Clairsentience, the title of the Nigerian artist's latest EP, is simply defined as the ability to perceive things clearly. A clairsentient person perceives the world through their emotions. Contrary to popular belief, clairsentience isn't a paranormal sixth sense reserved for the chosen few, our inner child reveals that it's an innate faculty that lives within us before the world told us who to be.

Born in 1994 in Benin City, Nigeria, AYLØ knew he wanted to be a musician since he was six-years-old. Raised against the colorful backdrop of his dad's jazz records and the echoes of church choirs from his mother's vast gospel collections, making music isn't something anyone pushed him towards, it organically came to be. By revisiting his past to reconcile his promising future, he shares that, "Music is about your experiences. You have to live to write shit. Everything adds up to the music."

Our conversation emphasized the importance of trusting your gut feelings, how to remedy imposter syndrome and why our identity is best rooted in who we are, rather than what we do,

This interview has been edited for purposes of brevity and clarity.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Bobi Wine and His Wife Released from House Arrest

Ugandan politician Bobi Wine and his wife Barbara Itungo Kyagulanyi have been released from a near two-week military house arrest following a recent ruling from a Ugandan court.