Sho Madjozi. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Listen to Sho Madjozi’s Debut Album ‘Limpopo Champions League’ Featuring Kwesta, pH, Makwa, Ycee and More

Sho Madjozi's debut album is here.

Sho Madjozi's debut album Limpopo Champions League came out today. In the last two years, the genre-bending rapper has created a major buzz for herself through hard hitting singles—"Huku," "Dumi Hiphone,"—that blended rap and gqom.


There's more to the artist to just blending rap and gqom, though. When we interviewed her earlier this year, while she was still working on the album, she had this to say about the direction she was taking on the project:

"People are gonna get to know me a lot more. I'll be more full in my sound. [It will be] an album that showcases what's going on in my world—I don't only listen to gqom; it's not the only influence I have. There's xibelani, Xitsonga music, Shangaan electro, xingondo—which is the Venda and Zimbabwean music… those influences. So I wanna get more live instruments, those traditional guitars and stuff."

And that's exactly what you'll find on Limpopo Champions League. The opening song "Ro Rali" (and later "Kona") sees the artist riding those big high-paced drums of Shangaan electro, before she gets back to gqom on "Idhom" and the title track. "Wa Penga Na" featuring Kwesta and Makwa and "Gong Down" featuring pH are beautiful trap-leaning rap songs, while "Don't Tell Me What To Do" is an EDM/pop fire starter that wouldn't feel out of place in a Major Lazer album.

Sho Madjozi - Huku (Official Music Video) www.youtube.com

The song "Yaz' Abelunga" sees the MC speak on white privilege. She raps:

"Being umlungu must be nice/ There's a God, he must be white/ They do enough to learn your tongue/ But you don't know theirs, you're left behind/ Being umlungu must be great/ They don't even have to learn your name/ My boy, what's the point?/ All black people look the same"

It's all tongue-in-cheek.

Limpopo Champions League is in indicator of some of the artist's tastes and abilities, and it does a great job of fully introducing her to the game.

Download the album here, and revisit our interview with her here.

‎Limpopo Champions League by Sho Madjozi itunes.apple.com


‎Album · 2018 · 13 Songs

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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