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ElectricJive 'Classic Mbaqanga Girl Groups' Vol. 4

Between the 1950s and 60s, South African girl groups were making names for themselves. In its fourth mixtape installment, Electricjive has brought back some of the funk-induced hits.


ElectricJive recently release its fourth installment of their outstanding series Classic Mbaqanga Girl Groups. Each mixtape features an eclectic mix of hits from 1950/60s South African girl groups. For this installment, they focused on swing-like melodies and vocals that are anything but ordinary in mbaqanga music. The mix features the likes of Mahotella Queens, Sannah Mnguni, Izintombi Zesi Manje Manje and plenty more. Listen to two songs off the mix and download them directly from ElectricJive. For more classic Mbaqanga mixes, check out these previously featured mixtapes.

[audio:http://www.okayafrica.com/wp-content/uploads/29-Mhlobo-Mdala.mp3|titles=The Queens and Ndlondlo Bashise Band "Mhlobo Mdala"]

>>>The Queens and Ndlondlo Bashise Band "Mhlobo Mdala"

>>>Download: "Classic Mbaqanga Girl Group Vol. 4" via ElectricJive

1. AWUTHULE BO- MAHOTELLA QUEENS (1970)

2. SANGENA SANGENA – IZINGANE ZO MGQASHIYO (1968)

3. SALANI KAHLE – IZINTOMBI ZESI MANJE MANJE (1971)

4. MMATHOBELA – MAHOTELLA QUEENS (1977)

5. UTHULELENI- SWEET SIXTEENS (1969)

6. SIYIYANIDUDUZA – THE QUEENS (1974)

7. SIYA KWA MZILIKAZI – IZINTOMBI ZESI MANJE MANJE (1973)

8. UMUZWA NGEDWA – MAHOTELLA QUEENS (1967)

9. AKASHAYWA UMFAZI – SKASHAYWA UMFAZI (1968)

10. BARATSALE – THE QUEENS AND NDLONDLO BASHISE BAND (1976)

11. METSOALLE YAKA – MAHOTELLA QUEENS (1977)

12. MATHAMYIZIMIMYABA – IZINTOMBI ZEPHEPHA (1976)

13. MUSU DLALA NGAMI – MAHLABATHINI (1976)

14. IMINYAKA KAYIFANI- IZINTOMBI ZESI MANJE MANJE (1977)

15. MAILE – MAHOTELLA QUEENS (1980)

16. MORADI WA MOFOKENG – IZINTOMBI ZOMGQASHIYO (1984)

17. MOLEKO NTLOHELE – MAHOTELLA QUEENS (1984)

18. VULAMEHLO – S’MORDEN GIRLS (1980)

19. SIDLALA YONKE IMIDLALO – IZINTOMBI ZESI MANJE MANJE(1977)

20. HO BO TLE – MAHOTELLA QUEENS (1980)

21. SIKHULEKILE – MAHLABATHINI AND IZINTOMBI ZEPHEPHA (1976)

22. NIMZWILE UMNTIMANDE – SANNAH MNGUNI NESIMANJEMANJE (1971)

23. NGINOTHANDO – THE QUEENS AND NDLONDLO BASHISE BAND (1976)

24. AWUNGIFANELANGA – SWEET SIXTEENS (1969)

25. HOLE THABA – DARK CITY SISTERS (1968)

26. ULELE EMINI U MAKOTI – DAVEYTON SISTERS (1965)

27. SICELA INDLELA – IZINTOMBI ZESI MANJE MANJE (1973)

28. UYANGIZUNGEZA LOMBEMU – USIZWE NAMATSHITSHI (1971)

29. MHLOBO MDALA – THE QUEENS AND NDLONDOL BASHISE BAND (1976)

30. SENGIBUYA EMARABINI – MAHOTELLA QUEENS (1968)

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