Nasty C and T.I Address Police Brutality Against Black People in New Single ‘They Don’t’

Stream Nasty C and T.I.'s new song 'They Don't.'

It's finally here. Since January of 2019, it's been public knowledge that Nasty C and T.I. had some work in the pipeline. Titled "They Don't," the song by the two rappers addresses the ongoing police brutality that has for years been specifically targeted at black people.


Nasty C handles the song's melodic hook, singing:

"I can only imagine the pain and the grief/from the innocent mothers with all the shit they had to see/ when you lose the ones you love to the fuckin' police /it cuts deep."

The Durban-born rapper makes a lot of references to God in his verse, mentioning he can only pray for things to get better. He raps:

"When you lose the ones you love to the fuckin' police, it cuts deep/ When Heaven calls and the angels do they job/ We start to question God like we could play His part"

In his verse, T.I. talks about the current protests that have erupted from the killing of George Floyd. He raps:

"2020, guess it's the year of the burn, consequences you earned/ To build this nation that you hate me in, the karma's returned/ Well, that's a stupid question, when will you learn?/ You never will, word to George Floyd, Emmett Till, and Sean Bell/ Guess they'd rather see us all in civil unrest/ Than to go and make some fuckin' arrests, fuck is that?"

"They Don't" is a great moment for hip-hop, especially in South Africa. Nasty C has expressed many times that T.I. is one of his biggest inspirations as a rapper as he was one of the first hip-hop artists he listened to and who inspired him to pen his own raps.

Stream "They Don't" on Apple Music and Spotify.



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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

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