#Okay100Women

This Psychotherapist Is On A Mission To Make Sure Black Women Feel Supported In A Global Pandemic

Bea Arthur's online platform The Difference offers tools to make therapy accessible to those who are historically denied emotional support: Black women.

As the world reels from the devastation and subsequent isolation of the COVID-19 global pandemic, there is a big, glaring question mark on what intimacy looks like for Black women in the absence of sisterhood or companionship. Loneliness is a big topic for all of us right now, and touch deprivation is a real and agonizing phenomenon that many are experiencing for the first time.

I got a taste of our current socially distanced reality a few years back during an extended—and purposeful—dance with abstinence. As a transplant to New York City with few friends and no family nearby, cutting off physical romance had another drawback; I soon realized that healthy, positive, platonic touch was rare and its absence painful. Denying oneself of sex is one thing, but not having access to any type of nourishing physical contact for long periods of time can be hard on the body and mind.

I found myself holding my breath for something. Anything that would make me feel alive, like the electric energy of a friendly embrace. First, I turned to public spaces, where the communal gathering of humans made me feel less alone. And then, I turned on the computer.

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Introducing OkayAfrica's 100 Women 2020 List

Celebrating African Women Laying the Groundwork for the Future

It would not be hyperbole to consider the individuals we're honoring for OkayAfrica's 100 Women 2020 list as architects of the future.

This is to say that these women are building infrastructure, both literally and metaphorically, for future generations in Africa and in the Diaspora. And they are doing so intentionally, reaching back, laterally, and forward to bridge gaps and make sure the steps they built—and not without hard work, mines of microaggressions, and challenges—are sturdy enough for the next ascent.

In short, the women on this year's list are laying the groundwork for other women to follow. It's what late author and American novelist Toni Morrison would call your "real job."

"I tell my students, 'When you get these jobs that you have been so brilliantly trained for, just remember that your real job is that if you are free, you need to free somebody else. If you have some power, then your job is to empower somebody else."

And that's what inspired us in the curation of this year's list. Our honorees use various mediums to get the job done—DJ's, fashion designers, historians, anthropologists, and even venture capitalists—but each with the mission to clear the road ahead for generations to come. Incredible African women like Eden Ghebreselassie, a marketing lead at ESPN who created a non-profit to fight energy poverty in Eritrea; or Baratang Miya, who is quite literally building technology clubs for disadvantaged youth in South Africa.

There are the builds that aren't physically tangible—movements that inspire women to show up confidently in their skin, like Enam Asiama's quest to normalize plus-sized bodies and Frédérique (Freddie) Harrel's push for Black and African women to embrace the kink and curl of their hair.

And then there are those who use their words to build power, to take control of the narrative, and to usher in true inclusion and equity. Journalists, (sisters Nikki and Lola Ogunnaike), a novelist (Oyinkan Braithwaite), a media maven (Yolisa Phahle), and a number of historians (Nana Oforiatta Ayim, Leïla Sy) to name a few.

In a time of uncertainty in the world, there's assuredness in the mission to bring up our people. We know this moment of global challenge won't last. It is why we are moving forward to share this labor of love with you, our trusted and loyal audience. We hope that this list serves as a beacon for you during this moment—insurance that future generations will be alright. And we have our honorees to thank for securing that future.

EXPERIENCE 100 WOMEN 2020

The annual OkayAfrica 100 Women List is our effort to acknowledge and uplift African women, not only as a resource that has and will continue to enrich the world we live in, but as a group that deserves to be recognized, reinforced and treasured on a global scale. In the spirit of building infrastructure, this year's list will go beyond the month of March (Women's History Month in America) and close in September during Women's Month in South Africa.

100 women 2020

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