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Fans Want Davido's 'FEM' To Be Nominated For the 'Social Change' Grammy

During the #EndSARS movement, Davido's 'FEM' became an unlikely rally battle cry. Now, Nigerians want to see the song get an accolade for its role in one of Nigeria's most talked about protests in recent time.


Earlier this year, The Recording Academy announced that it would be releasing new categories under its award sections, and one of these songs included was for Best Song for Social Change.

Davido fans have caught on to this change. And they are now pushing for "FEM" to be one of the songs nominated. In a recent Twitter frenzy, a bevy of Davido fans are saying that the Nigerian Afrobeats singer deserves the award for his song, which became an unexpected call to arms for the #EndSARS coalition. According to the Academy, the determining criteria for the "Best Song for Social Change" category would be based on the principle that the song inspired some form of social good that benefitted the general public, and Nigerian Twitter seems to think Davido's controversial record fits the bill. Many people are taking their opinions a step further by submitting their votes to the Recording Academy's website in droves.

Following the tragedy of the October 20, 2020 protests at Lekki toll gate in Lagos, Nigeria, the #EndSARS conversation continues to leave a bitter taste in the mouths of many Nigerians. The movement sparked global outrage after a group of young people across Nigeria took to the streets calling for the end of the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS). During this time, Davido's "FEM," became the unanimous battlecry for the social justice initiative.

The word "FEM" translates into "shut up," and although the "Stand Strong" singer did not intend for the song to be linked to the campaign, according to his statement to NME, it essentially became a voice for the mega rallies for justice. Later that year, the ongoing protests, which started out mildly, triggered members of SARS to respond with lethal force and eventually culminated to deaths at the Lekki Toll Gate in Lagos.

On the wide spectrum, while many Nigerians pointed out that the song might have been recorded in an unrelated cause, a multiple fans agree that it played an unforgettable part in the history of one of Nigeria's biggest protests in recent time. In addition to his voice being associated with the political outcry, Davido also joined protesters to denounce the effects of SARS on the lives of Nigerian youth in multiple vivd photos shared online at the time. Below are some of the reactions that some Twitter users had to the recent development.

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Photo by NurPhoto via Getty Images.

A Year After #EndSARS, Nigerian Youth Maintain That Nothing Has Changed

Despite the disbandment of the SARS units, young Nigerians are still being treated as criminals. We talk to several of them about their experiences since the #EndSARS protests.

On September 12th, Tobe, a 22-year-old student at the University of Nigeria's Enugu Campus was on his way to Shoprite to hang out with his friends when the tricycle he had boarded was stopped by policemen. At first, Tobe thought they were about to check the driver's documents, but he was wrong. "An officer told me to come down, he started searching me like I was a criminal and told me to pull down my trousers, I was so scared that my mind was racing in different ways, I wasn't wearing anything flashy nor did I have an iPhone or dreads — things they would use to describe me as a yahoo boy," he says.

They couldn't find anything on him and when he tried to defend himself, claiming he had rights, one of the police officers slapped him. "I fell to the ground sobbing but they dragged me by the waist and took me to their van where they collected everything including my phone and the 8,000 Naira I was with."

Luckily for Tobe, they let him go free after 2 hours. "They set me free because they caught another pack of boys who were in a Venza car, but they didn't give me my money completely, they gave me 2,000 Naira for my transport," he says.

It's no news that thousands of Nigerian youth have witnessed incidents like Tobe's — many more worse than his. It's this helpless and seemingly unsolvable situation which prompted the #EndSARS protests. Sparked after a viral video of a man who was shot just because he was driving an SUV and was mistaken as a yahoo boy, the #EndSARS protests saw millions of young Nigerians across several states of the country come out of their homes and march against a system has killed unfathomable numbers of people for invalid or plain stupid reasons. The protests started on October 6th, 2020 and came to a seize after a tragedy struck on October 20th of the same year.

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