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South Africa's midfielder Linda Motlhalo (L) and South Africa's defender Janine Van Wyk celebrate after scoring a goal during the FIFA international friendly football match between South Africa and Jamaica at the Moses Mabhida Stadium in Durban , South Africa on April 7, 2019. - South Africa's Women Team, known as "Banyana Banyana", has qualified for the FIFA Women's World Cup in France 2019. (Photo: ANESH DEBIKY/AFP/Getty Images)

South Africa's National Women's Football Team to Receive Equal Pay

The Banyana Banyana, will receive the same pay as their male counterparts for the first time ever as they head to the FIFA World Cup.

Last November it was announced that South Africa's national women's football Team, the Banyana Banyana, would be heading to the FIFA Women's World Cup for the first time ever. South Africans celebrated the news, but some also pointed out that despite their successes, the female players were still being payed less than their male counterparts.

This is set to change however, as for the first time ever South Africa's women's team and its men's team, Bafana Bafana, will earn the same pay as they head to the World Cup in France and the African Cup of Nations (Afcon) in Egypt, respectively, Times Live reports.

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Courtesy of Bonang Matheba

In Conversation with Bonang Matheba: 'I Know What Just One Educated Girl Can Do for a Community'

The TV star talks about getting the presidential nod, her new sparkling wine and sending 300 Black girls to university by 2030.

A few weeks ago, South Africans turned out in droves to vote in the most contested elections the country has had. Bonang Matheba was front and center in efforts to get South Africans to the polls. She even brought President Cyril Ramaphosa on her Instagram Live to talk before urging South Africans to vote for whoever they felt would bring about necessary change.

Bonang's love for the youth is irrefutable and the Bonang Matheba Bursary Fund is proof of this. She was recently named this year's Ultimate Pop Culture Icon by E! Africa and co-produced Public Figure, a documentary film about the highs and lows of social media. The film was screened at the Manchester Film Festival in March and was well-received by critics during a time where there's talk about reigning in the influence of large tech companies. Bonang speaks about how she has personally witnessed the impact that social media has on the youth and felt obligated to document that reality.

Perhaps what stands out most is how Bonang is invested in leaving a legacy behind for the Black community. Sure, she's shattering glass ceilings and making lots of money in the process but she's also set her sights on taking as many punches as she can so that all the Black girls who come after her don't have to. "I want girls to be empowered," she says simply. "I want girls to have the freedom to make their own choices, but I also want them to go to school. That's what I want."

We sat down with Bonang to talk about her new Méthode Cap Classique (MCC) sparkling wine, the House of BNG. We also spoke more on why she's so damn passionate about sending Black girls to school.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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Arts + Culture
Samuel Fosso, Self Portrait, 1977. International Center of Photography, Purchase, with fundsprovided by the ICP Aquisitions Committee, 2004 (19.2004) © Samuel Fosso, Courtesy JMPatras/Paris

These Portraits by African Photographers Reveal the Power In Self-Presentation

We take a tour through the International Center for Photography's "Your Mirror: Portraits from the ICP Collection", which features influential works from Malick Sidibé, Zanele Muholi, Samuel Fosso and more.

The eyes of the young woman in Zanele Muholi's "Anele, 'Anza' Khaba," look as if they're staring directly into your soul. With her arms folded against her chest, it seems she might be putting a guard up or that they might simply be trying to look cool for the camera. With portraiture especially, how far you decide to read into something is up to you, as often, the line between a subject's desire for self-presentation and what the photographer themselves seeks to convey, isn't always clear. These are the types of observations that the "Your Mirror: Portraits from the ICP Collection", sparked in my mind as I strolled through the space with its Director of Exhibitions and Collections, Erin Barnett.

"You learn a lot about yourself and about other people by looking at portraits, but not always what you think you know," she says. We also learn a lot about the person behind the lens. The ICP's exhibit features works from photographers from across the globe, with the mission of surveying "the nuanced ways people present themselves for the camera, how and by whom they are represented, and who is deemed worthy of commemoration." The works of four prominent African photographers are included in the exhibition: the Malian icon Malick Sidibé, Cameroon's Samuel Fosso, along with South African photographers Zanele Muholi, and Lolo Veleko. Their photographs, the settings, and who they choose to document, give us a glimpse into their vision as much as it does the subjects in their photographs (which for Samuel Fosso, in this case, is himself.)

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