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Listen to The Busy Twist's Addictive Remixes of 1970s Angolan Tracks

From the upcoming London Luanda Remix Series.

About 10 years ago, Analog Africa released their initial Angola Soundtrack, a compilation of gems from late '60s and early '70s Luanda. Now, those songs are getting new life courtesy of London-based production duo The Busy Twist.

These psychedelic Angolan guitars and rhythms get revisited in London Luanda Remix Series, a new 4-track release that sees the UK producers digging into the original Analog Africa archives and injecting these throwback sounds with new percussive energy.

Today, we're premiering the London Luanda standout "Africa Ritmo - Olha O Pica," a potent remix made for the dance floor.

"The first time I listened to Angolan folk music was after discovering one of Analog Africa's compilations of '70s Angolan folk," mentions one of the members of The Busy Twist.


"I was immediately hooked by the richness and melancholy feel of the old distorted electric guitars. This was so different to all the kuduro and other music I had known to come from Angola, so I wanted to highlight my perspective of this music and bring out these elements in way that could be played across dance floors but still kept the feeling behind the original songs."

Listen to our premiere below and look out for London-Luanda Remix Series coming out June 3 on Galletas Calientes Records. Pre-order here.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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