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Tiwa Savage Cancels Upcoming South African Performance Amidst Xenophobic Attacks

"I refuse to watch the barbaric butchering of my people in SA," says Tiwa Savage.

Nigerian super star Tiwa Savage took to Twitter this morning to let the world know she was pulling out of the Delicious Festival happening this month in South Africa.

Tiwa's announcement comes after a number of Nigerian artists condemned the xenophobic attacks that took place in South Africa in the past week. Burna Boy shared that he had never set foot in South Africa since 2017 because of the country's xenophobia. He promised to never come to South Africa ever again if the government doesn't take measures to protect Nigerians living in South Africa.

READ: Burna Boy to Donate Proceeds from Upcoming Show In South Africa to Victims of Xenophobic Violence




South African rapper AKA rubbed many people the wrong way when his tweets were interpreted as xenophobic last night. Burna Boy, in a since deleted tweet, even made a promise to put hands on AKA the next time he sees him.


Mobs of angry South Africans having been vandalizing and looting small businesses owned by foreign nationals, and some South African business owners suffered, too. It all started when an allegedly Nigerian drug dealer shot a South African taxi driver in Pretoria.

Protests by taxi drivers led to the lootings and eventually killings in both Pretoria and Joburg. South Africa is again on the spotlight for xenophobia. In the past, a number of South Africans haven't been welcoming to Africans from other countries living and working in their country, leading to sporadic attacks on Africans from outside the country. The main reason cited by a number of South Africans is that foreign nationals bring crime into South Africa and "steal our jobs."

The attacks have been condemned by many South African personalities, ordinary people and the president.

Interview
Photo: Shawn Theodore via Schure Media Group/Roc Nation

Interview: Buju Banton Is a Lyrical Purveyor of African Truth

A candid conversation with the Jamaican icon about his new album, Upside Down 2020, his influence on afrobeats, and the new generation of dancehall.

Devout fans of reggae music have been longing for new musical offerings from Mark Anthony Myrie, widely-known as the iconic reggae superstar Buju Banton. A shining son of Jamaican soil, with humble beginnings as one of 15 siblings in the close-knit community of Salt Lane, Kingston, the 46-year-old musician is now a legend in his own right.

Buju Banton has 12 albums under his belt, one Grammy Award win for Best Reggae Album, numerous classic hits and a 30-year domination of the industry. His larger-than-life persona, however, is more than just the string of accolades that follow in the shadows of his career. It is his dutiful, authentic style of Caribbean storytelling that has captured the minds and hearts of those who have joined him on this long career ride.

The current socio-economic climate of uncertainty that the COVID-19 pandemic has thrusted onto the world, coupled with the intensified fight against racism throughout the diaspora, have taken centre stage within the last few months. Indubitably, this makes Buju—and by extension, his new album—a timely and familiar voice of reason in a revolution that has called for creative evolution.

With his highly-anticipated album, Upside Down 2020, the stage is set for Gargamel. The title of this latest discography feels nothing short of serendipitous, and with tracks such as "Memories" featuring John Legend and the follow-up dancehall single "Blessed," it's clear that this latest body of work is a rare gem that speaks truth to vision and celebrates our polylithic African heritage in its rich fullness and complexities.

Having had an exclusive listen to some other tracks on the album back in April, our candid one-on-one conversation with Buju Banton journeys through his inspiration, collaboration and direction for Upside Down 2020, African cultural linkages and the next generational wave of dancehall and reggae.

This interview has been shortened and edited for clarity.

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[Op-Ed] Speeka: “‘Dankie San’ brought me closer to kasi rap”

A personal reflection on one of South Africa's most influential hip-hop albums, 'Dankie San' by PRO.