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Tiwa Savage Cancels Upcoming South African Performance Amidst Xenophobic Attacks

"I refuse to watch the barbaric butchering of my people in SA," says Tiwa Savage.

Nigerian super star Tiwa Savage took to Twitter this morning to let the world know she was pulling out of the Delicious Festival happening this month in South Africa.

Tiwa's announcement comes after a number of Nigerian artists condemned the xenophobic attacks that took place in South Africa in the past week. Burna Boy shared that he had never set foot in South Africa since 2017 because of the country's xenophobia. He promised to never come to South Africa ever again if the government doesn't take measures to protect Nigerians living in South Africa.

READ: Burna Boy to Donate Proceeds from Upcoming Show In South Africa to Victims of Xenophobic Violence




South African rapper AKA rubbed many people the wrong way when his tweets were interpreted as xenophobic last night. Burna Boy, in a since deleted tweet, even made a promise to put hands on AKA the next time he sees him.


Mobs of angry South Africans having been vandalizing and looting small businesses owned by foreign nationals, and some South African business owners suffered, too. It all started when an allegedly Nigerian drug dealer shot a South African taxi driver in Pretoria.

Protests by taxi drivers led to the lootings and eventually killings in both Pretoria and Joburg. South Africa is again on the spotlight for xenophobia. In the past, a number of South Africans haven't been welcoming to Africans from other countries living and working in their country, leading to sporadic attacks on Africans from outside the country. The main reason cited by a number of South Africans is that foreign nationals bring crime into South Africa and "steal our jobs."

The attacks have been condemned by many South African personalities, ordinary people and the president.

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Photo Credit: Getty Images

Global Citizen x OkayAfrica: The Impact of Conflict on Children

An estimated 1.4 million children have been hit by schools closing in the Tigray region of Ethiopia amid conflict and crisis. Here's how that's impacting Ethiopia's children.

In times of conflict and war, school-aged children could have their futures defined by whether or not they can access education amid ongoing violence.

Ethiopia's northern region of Tigray is in the midst of a war that has impacted millions of lives and affected neighboring regions, Amhara and Afar. The war — which has forced citizens to flee, has tipped the region into famine, and has barricaded humanitarian aid from reaching the most vulnerable — has now been going on for about 11 months.

As the beginning of the school season draws nearer, safely reopening schools, making education accessible, and protecting children from the impacts of violence in the affected regions is a priority for aid agencies.

"As schools prepare to reopen in early October in most parts of the country, in Tigray and the bordering regions of Afar and Amhara, where the conflict has expanded, education remains at a standstill," Director of Education Cannot Wait, Yasmine Sherif, told Global Citizen.

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How Beauty Boy, Enioluwa Adeoluwa, Is Shattering the Expectations of Masculinity In Nigeria

Affectionately known as Lipgloss Boy, Enioluwa has become one of the most popular influencers in Nigeria — and he's done so without conforming to the notions of masculinity or imposed limitations on what a man should be able to do.