Popular

Tiwa Savage Cancels Upcoming South African Performance Amidst Xenophobic Attacks

"I refuse to watch the barbaric butchering of my people in SA," says Tiwa Savage.

Nigerian super star Tiwa Savage took to Twitter this morning to let the world know she was pulling out of the Delicious Festival happening this month in South Africa.

Tiwa's announcement comes after a number of Nigerian artists condemned the xenophobic attacks that took place in South Africa in the past week. Burna Boy shared that he had never set foot in South Africa since 2017 because of the country's xenophobia. He promised to never come to South Africa ever again if the government doesn't take measures to protect Nigerians living in South Africa.

READ: Burna Boy to Donate Proceeds from Upcoming Show In South Africa to Victims of Xenophobic Violence




South African rapper AKA rubbed many people the wrong way when his tweets were interpreted as xenophobic last night. Burna Boy, in a since deleted tweet, even made a promise to put hands on AKA the next time he sees him.


Mobs of angry South Africans having been vandalizing and looting small businesses owned by foreign nationals, and some South African business owners suffered, too. It all started when an allegedly Nigerian drug dealer shot a South African taxi driver in Pretoria.

Protests by taxi drivers led to the lootings and eventually killings in both Pretoria and Joburg. South Africa is again on the spotlight for xenophobia. In the past, a number of South Africans haven't been welcoming to Africans from other countries living and working in their country, leading to sporadic attacks on Africans from outside the country. The main reason cited by a number of South Africans is that foreign nationals bring crime into South Africa and "steal our jobs."

The attacks have been condemned by many South African personalities, ordinary people and the president.

Popular

How Technology Is Playing a Crucial Role in the #EndSARS Protests

Young people in Nigeria have successfully managed to use technological innovations to organize and make the #EndSARS protests run incredibly efficiently and easily. This moment will go down in history as a revolution that was birthed via technology.

It has been more than a week since young people in Nigeria took to the streets to demand that the Special Anti-Robbery Squad, infamously known as SARS, be scrapped for good. Created in 1992, this police unit was originally set up to beat back armed robbery, the use of firearms and rising cases of kidnappings that grew in the late eighties. However, the unit went rogue, becoming more notorious for its savagery than actual crime-fighting. With a rap sheet ranging from profiling, harassment and assault to, in more extreme cases, slaughtering innocent citizens, these quasi-officers have unleashed terror on the nation for more than two decades.

Their victims are predominantly young Nigerians profiled on appearance—whether they drive exotic vehicles, use the latest gadgets, have their hair dyed or locked, or have piercings. In some cases, working in tech often gets conflated with financial fraud. For people who don't meet the absurd criteria, the mood of the officer can often become the difference between life and death.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

Emile YX? Wants to 'Reconnect The String'

The father of South African hip-hop's latest book release is here to teach you about the culture.