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Tiwa Savage Cancels Upcoming South African Performance Amidst Xenophobic Attacks

"I refuse to watch the barbaric butchering of my people in SA," says Tiwa Savage.

Nigerian super star Tiwa Savage took to Twitter this morning to let the world know she was pulling out of the Delicious Festival happening this month in South Africa.

Tiwa's announcement comes after a number of Nigerian artists condemned the xenophobic attacks that took place in South Africa in the past week. Burna Boy shared that he had never set foot in South Africa since 2017 because of the country's xenophobia. He promised to never come to South Africa ever again if the government doesn't take measures to protect Nigerians living in South Africa.

READ: Burna Boy to Donate Proceeds from Upcoming Show In South Africa to Victims of Xenophobic Violence




South African rapper AKA rubbed many people the wrong way when his tweets were interpreted as xenophobic last night. Burna Boy, in a since deleted tweet, even made a promise to put hands on AKA the next time he sees him.


Mobs of angry South Africans having been vandalizing and looting small businesses owned by foreign nationals, and some South African business owners suffered, too. It all started when an allegedly Nigerian drug dealer shot a South African taxi driver in Pretoria.

Protests by taxi drivers led to the lootings and eventually killings in both Pretoria and Joburg. South Africa is again on the spotlight for xenophobia. In the past, a number of South Africans haven't been welcoming to Africans from other countries living and working in their country, leading to sporadic attacks on Africans from outside the country. The main reason cited by a number of South Africans is that foreign nationals bring crime into South Africa and "steal our jobs."

The attacks have been condemned by many South African personalities, ordinary people and the president.

Interview

A Candid Conversation With Olamide & Fireboy DML

We talk to the Nigerian stars about the hardest lessons they've learned, best advice they've ever been given and what Nigeria means to them.

Olamide and Fireboy DML have been working together for three years, but the first time they sit down to do an interview together is hours after they arrive in New York City on a promo tour.

It's Fireboy's first time in the Big Apple — and in the US — and the rain that's pouring outside his hotel doesn't hinder his gratitude. "It's such a relief to be here, it's long overdue," he tells OkayAfrica. "I was supposed to be here last year, but Covid stopped that. This is a time to reflect and refresh. It's a reset button for me."

Olamide looks on, smiling assuredly. Since signing Fireboy to his YBNL Nation label in 2018, he's watched the soulful young singer rise to become one of Nigeria's most talked-about artists — from his breakout single, "Jealous," to his debut album Laughter, Tears & Goosebumps, hit collabs with D.Smoke and Cuppy, and his sophomore release, Apollo, last year.

Even while he shares his own latest record, UY Scuti, with the world, Olamide nurtures Fireboy's career with as much care and attention as he does his own, oscillating between his two roles of artist and label exec seamlessly. His 2020 album Carpe Diem is the most streamed album ever by an African rap artist, according to Audiomack, hitting over 140 million streams. When Olamide signed a joint venture with US-based record label and distribution company, Empire, in February last year he did so through his label, bringing Fireboy and any other artist he decides to sign along for the ride, and establishing one of the most noteworthy deals on the continent.

Below, Olamide & Fireboy DML speak to OkayAfrica about their mutual admiration for each other, what makes them get up in the morning and how they switch off.

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