Popular
Image courtesy of 'Tjovitjo.'

You can now watch Warren Masemola's outstanding performance on 'Tjovitjo' which just hit Netflix.

Popular Pantsula Dance Drama Series ‘Tjovitjo’ is Now Streaming on Netflix

You can now stream 'Tjovitjo,' the popular South African drama series centered on pantsula dance, on Netflix.

More than two years since its initial premiere, the popular South African drama series Tjovitjo can now be streamed on Netflix. When the show first aired on the national channel SABC 1 in August 20, 2017, it enjoyed a massive record-breaking viewership, pulling in an excess of 5.7 million viewers.


At the time, SABC1 Programme Manager Sane Zondi was quoted by various news sources as saying:

"You can benchmark against previous drama series like Yizo Yizo which attracted around 3 million viewers. Tshisa pulled about 4,7 million and Zone 14 drew up to 4,5 million viewers. All of these were on SABC1. So, in a way, SABC 1 sets and breaks its own records."

The show won multiple awards, most notably Best TV Drama at the SAFTAs (South African Film and Television Awards) in 2018.

Tjovitjo is centered on isipantsula (pantsula dance), which has been a part of South African urban culture for decades since the 1950s, and still continues to resonate across the world to this day. The show follows the dance group AmaTjovitjo and uses dance as an entry point to highlighting the plights faced by South Africa's working class every day.

Beloved and versatile actor Warren Masemola is the lead on the show which captured the hearts of South Africans. Tjovitjo was directed by Vincent Moloi, a veteran in South African television.

Watch the trailer for Tjovitjo below and head over to Netflix to get binge watching.

Tjovitjo Trailer www.youtube.com

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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