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Watch The Cape Flats-Filmed Visuals for Zaki Ibrahim's 'Draw The Line'

Canadian/South African singer Zaki Ibrahim releases the visuals for "Draw The Line" the first track on her debut album "Every Opposite."

Canadian/South African smoldering soulstress Zaki Ibrahim returns with stunning visuals for "Draw The Line," the opening track from her 2012 album Every Opposite. The song features the geographically diverse soundscapes we've come to know from the Cape Town-based singer/songwriter — thundering percussive elements rumble throughout under airy background vocals, entrancing listeners in a complex, emotive & rhythmic spell. In the visuals for the song, Ibrahim's earthy, soul-capturing voice floats above clean, starkly beautiful images of the Cape Flats. Following a young girl as she navigates through her everyday environment, the video presents a type of imperfect innocence. Shots cut between sweeping views of Cape Town's diverse landscape and the girl gazing into the camera, her pensive stares holding a sense of longing and wonder for a future that seems distant and unknown. When speaking about the message behind her recently released visuals, and how she's represented in the imagery, Ibrahim commented,


"The "Draw The Line" story does show me, but not exactly. Coming from the Cape Flats and overcoming an environment with challenges such as poverty, drugs, sexual assault, and Post-Apartheid conditioning is no easy feat. Creating your own path and shining your light through adversity, taking everything that you’ve experienced and everything you are, is what the song is about."

Watch the visuals for  Zaki Ibrahim's 'persevere against all odds' anthem below and, ahead of the release of Finding Fela,’ revisit when Zaki Ibrahim teamed up with fellow SA artists Spoek Mathambo and Petite Noir to pay tribute to Fela Kuti with an electronic reinterpretation of "Zombie."

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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