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Shauna Barbosa's 'Cape Verdean Blues' Is a Poetic Exploration Of Movement & Cultural Inheritance

We spoke with the Cape Verdean-American author about the experiences that helped shape her stunning literary debut.

The reason we are where we are now is due to the movement of those who came before us.

For children of immigrants, movement—or the act of leaving one place for another—is the root of our cultural identities; the sole reason why some of us identify as Liberian-American, British-Ugandan and for others, Swedish-Eritrean. Shauna Barbosa, a poet born in Boston to an African-American mother and Cape Verdean father, captures the journeys of her parents and the unique upbringing which came about as a result in her stunning literary debut, Cape Verdean Blues.

Growing up in Boston she was physically surrounded by the culture and customs of each of her parents—her extended family on both sides lived on different floors of the same townhouse. These ultraspecific, yet familiar childhood experiences fostered her knack for writing at an early age. Each experience surfacing once again in Cape Verdean Blues.

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This Nigerian Author Just Landed a Major Film Deal for Her Debut Novel 'My Sister, the Serial Killer'

Oyinkan Braithwaite's first novel is set to be adapted into a film and it isn't even out yet.

First-time Nigerian author Oyinkan Braithwaite's novel My Sister, the Serial Killer, has been picked up by UK production companies Working Title and Big Talk for a film adaptation ahead of its release, reports Deadline.

Braithwaite, a graduate of Creative Writing and Law from Kingston University and a 2016 finalist for the Commonwealth Short Story Prize, received a five-figure advance from US-based publisher Doubleplay for her hghly-anticiapted debut.

The slasher comedy follows the dark shenanigans of sisters Korede and Ayoola. Korede finds herself in a predicament when she's forced to deal with Ayoola's peculiar habit of killing off the men she dates.

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This Ugandan Author Just Won One of the Most Prestigious Literary Prizes For Her Debut Novel 'Kintu'

Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi was once rejected by British publishers who claimed her book was "too African."

First-time Ugandan author, Jennifer Nansubuga Makumbi has won the 2018 Windham Campbell Prizes from Yale University—one of the most prestigious literary awards—for her debut novel Kintu, reports BBC Africa.

After moving to the UK 17 years ago, Makumbi dedicated all of her time to writing—which affected her earnings. "I really put everything into writing," she told BBC Africa. "So for this to happen is unbelievable."

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