Audio

'African All Stars' Compilation With Tony Allen, Femi Kuti, Ebo Taylor, Tinariwen, Fantasma & More

Hear the 30-track 'African All Stars: The Best Indie & Alternative African Recordings From 1970 To 2015' compilation.


The African All Stars compilation brings together some of the most groundbreaking African artists from the past 45 years, established and contemporary, for an extensive 30-track collection. The release, which looks to showcase The Best Indie & Alternative African Recordings From 1970 To 2015, features contributions from an eclectic and striking roster that includes afrobeat torchbearers Tony Allen and Femi Kuti, Ghanaian highlife legend Ebo Taylor, Ethio-jazz pioneer Mulatu Astatke, and 70s Nigerian funk guitarist Harry Mosco, alongside newer names like Tuareg desert blues outfit Tinariwen, SA 'guzu' band Fantasma, London-Nairobi seven-piece Owiny Sigoma Band, Burkinabé rapper Art Melody, Rocky Marsiano, and Ibibio Sound Machine, among many others.

African All Stars: The Best Indie & Alternative African Recordings From 1970 To 2015 was put together by the independent digital music distributor Believe Digital and is being released in partnership by Okayafrica and French clothing label Babatunde. The 30-track compilation is available for purchase on iTunes and can be streamed in its entirety on Spotify, Rdio and Deezer.

>>>Grab Africa All Stars: The Best Indie & Alternative African Recordings From 1970 To 2015 on iTunes

>>>Enter To Win A Digital Copy Of 'African All Stars' + Babatunde Gear

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

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