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Okayfuture Audio: King Britt's Sonic Journey Into Afrofuturism

Stream veteran producer King Britt's podcast and sonic journey in the African electronic music style of Afrofuturism.


The family over at Okayfuture point towards this podcast + mix on the origins and current mutations of "Afrofuturism" from veteran producer and heavyweight remixer King Britt The man himself wrote some enlightening words on the subject for OKF:

I was asked a few months ago to curate a show on Afrofuturism and its influences on me and my compositional work. Afrofuturism is a term originated by Mark Dery who did an essay in the New York Times in 1995 called “Black To The Future.” It became a very famous term among Afro American musicians who embrace Science Fiction, realities of space and time, and who tend to look at other worlds, comic books, and that sort of thing, as a way of escape. You have authors like Octavia Butler who wrote Kindred and other amazing books, Kodwo Eshun who wrote More Brilliant Than the Sun: Adventures in Sonic Fiction, which really go into breaking down what Afrofuturism is. But basically it is the African American sound that embraces Science Fiction pioneered by artists Herbie Hancock, Miles Davis, Sun-Ra, Parliament Funkadelic, DJ Spooky, just to name a few.

The mix is part of the Noise From The 18th Floor series, presented by the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage. Listen to my interview with Tracy Tanenbaum as well as musical selections, listed and streamed below.

Stream A Sonic Journey Into AfroFuturism below, music starts around the 8:40 mark. For more from King Britt and Afrofuturism check out our recent interview with him and Tendai Maraire on their Zimbabwe project.

Part 1:

“Kawaida” -Kawaida

“Gamla Stan” – Don Cherry

plus: an interview with Alondra Nelson

“Ostinato” – Herbie Hancock (as Mwandishi)

“John McLaughlin” – Miles Davis

“Space Is the Place (Live)”- Sun Ra

plus: an interview with Pearl Britt

“Feel”- George Duke

“Rien Neva Plus” – Funk Factory

“Cabral” – Mtume feat. Dee Dee Bridgewater

“Radhe Shyam” – Alice Coltrane

plus: an interview with Sun Ra

Part 2:

“African Roots”- King Tubby

“Eyjafjallajokul” – Mad Professor

“Zodiac Shit” – Flying Lotus

“Ahoulaghuine Akaline (King Britt Remix)” – Bombino

“Teleport” – Headless Headhunters

“Nights Over Nantes” – Jneiro Jarel

“Castles” – HouseShoes feat. Jimetta Rose

“Brgundy” – MndDsgn

“Connect” – Some Other Ship

“All in Forms (Leatherette Remix)” – Bonobo

“Light Odyssey” – Union

“Planetary Analysis” – King Britt feat. Rich Media

“Discipline 3” – Ras G

plus: an interview with Sun Ra

“Heritage Ship” – Madlib

“Emotional Quotient Deringer of Chiek Anta Diop” -King Britt feat. Rilners Jouegck

“New Wave” -Common feat. Stereolab

“The Stars Are Singing Too” – Build an Ark

“Bug in the Bassbin” – Innerzone Orchestra

“Raven” – Actress

“Voodoo Ray” – A Guy Called Gerald

“Dem Young Scones” – Moodymann

“Flower (King Britt’s Underwater Garden Dub Remix)” – Soul Dhamma

“Planet Rock” – Afrika Bambaataa

“Mozaik” – Zomby

“Endgame” – Antipop Consortium

“Loveless” – 4Hero feat. Ursula

Part 3: Tomorrow

“Beyond the Sun (Live)” – Fhloston Paradigm

“Endeavors for Never (The Last Time We Spoke You Said You Were Not Here. I Saw You Though.)” – Shabazz Palaces

Spotlight
Photo by NurPhoto via Getty Images.

A Year After #EndSARS, Nigerian Youth Maintain That Nothing Has Changed

Despite the disbandment of the SARS units, young Nigerians are still being treated as criminals. We talk to several of them about their experiences since the #EndSARS protests.

On September 12th, Tobe, a 22-year-old student at the University of Nigeria's Enugu Campus was on his way to Shoprite to hang out with his friends when the tricycle he had boarded was stopped by policemen. At first, Tobe thought they were about to check the driver's documents, but he was wrong. "An officer told me to come down, he started searching me like I was a criminal and told me to pull down my trousers, I was so scared that my mind was racing in different ways, I wasn't wearing anything flashy nor did I have an iPhone or dreads — things they would use to describe me as a yahoo boy," he says.

They couldn't find anything on him and when he tried to defend himself, claiming he had rights, one of the police officers slapped him. "I fell to the ground sobbing but they dragged me by the waist and took me to their van where they collected everything including my phone and the 8,000 Naira I was with."

Luckily for Tobe, they let him go free after 2 hours. "They set me free because they caught another pack of boys who were in a Venza car, but they didn't give me my money completely, they gave me 2,000 Naira for my transport," he says.

It's no news that thousands of Nigerian youth have witnessed incidents like Tobe's — many more worse than his. It's this helpless and seemingly unsolvable situation which prompted the #EndSARS protests. Sparked after a viral video of a man who was shot just because he was driving an SUV and was mistaken as a yahoo boy, the #EndSARS protests saw millions of young Nigerians across several states of the country come out of their homes and march against a system has killed unfathomable numbers of people for invalid or plain stupid reasons. The protests started on October 6th, 2020 and came to a seize after a tragedy struck on October 20th of the same year.

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