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Prêt-À-Poundo: DC's Eco-Friendly Fashion Week

This is about the collaboration between DC Fashion Week and Inova Health System's Office of Sustainability featuring the work of eco-friendly fashion designers.


*A model wears a dress designed with miniature Vogue Magazine covers at DC Fashion Week's kickoff event, which showcased eco-friendly designs by Isagus Extroversions, Joanna Carrie, and Myra Sync in 2012.

DC Fashion Week is considered one of the fastest growing international fashion week exhibits in the world. It's held twice a year in February and September, and typically reaches an audience of more than 10 million people. Today, DC Fashion Week will collaborate with Inova Health System's Office of Sustainability to showcase the work of eco-friendly fashion designers and help support environmental sustainability in the fashion industry. It's a great initiative that highlights the fashion world's impact on the environment & public health and encourages people to see, learn and take action.

An example of the eco-friendly designs is blue wrap (pictured above), a recyclable material  woven from the plastic polypropylene and used in hospitals to cover sterilized surgical instruments — head here to learn more about it. The whole week will showcase fashion designers using organic cottons & dyes, as well asrecycled and reused materials. The featured designers will be Das Man, Nigeria's Estella Couture and the Kourtney Jaeson Collection.

WHEN: 6pm-8.30pm Monday, February 18, 2013

WHERE: Woolly Mammoth Theatre, 641 D Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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