Photos

Prêt-À-Poundo: DC's Eco-Friendly Fashion Week

This is about the collaboration between DC Fashion Week and Inova Health System's Office of Sustainability featuring the work of eco-friendly fashion designers.


*A model wears a dress designed with miniature Vogue Magazine covers at DC Fashion Week's kickoff event, which showcased eco-friendly designs by Isagus Extroversions, Joanna Carrie, and Myra Sync in 2012.

DC Fashion Week is considered one of the fastest growing international fashion week exhibits in the world. It's held twice a year in February and September, and typically reaches an audience of more than 10 million people. Today, DC Fashion Week will collaborate with Inova Health System's Office of Sustainability to showcase the work of eco-friendly fashion designers and help support environmental sustainability in the fashion industry. It's a great initiative that highlights the fashion world's impact on the environment & public health and encourages people to see, learn and take action.

An example of the eco-friendly designs is blue wrap (pictured above), a recyclable material  woven from the plastic polypropylene and used in hospitals to cover sterilized surgical instruments — head here to learn more about it. The whole week will showcase fashion designers using organic cottons & dyes, as well asrecycled and reused materials. The featured designers will be Das Man, Nigeria's Estella Couture and the Kourtney Jaeson Collection.

WHEN: 6pm-8.30pm Monday, February 18, 2013

WHERE: Woolly Mammoth Theatre, 641 D Street NW, Washington, DC 20004

Interview

Interview: The Awakening of Bas

We talk to Bas about The Messenger, Bobi Wine, Sudan, and the globalized body of Black pain.

The first thing you notice when you begin to listen to The Messenger—the new investigative documentary podcast following the rise of Ugandan singer, businessman and revolutionary political figure Bobi Wine—is Bas' rich, paced, and deeply-affecting storytelling voice.

Whether he is talking about Uganda's political landscape, painting a picture of Bobi Wine's childhood, or drawing parallels between the violence Black bodies face in America and the structural oppression Africans on the continent continue to endure at the hands of corrupt government administrations, there is no doubt that Bas (real name Abbas Hamad) has an intimate understanding of what he's talking about.

We speak via Zoom, myself in Lagos, and him in his home studio in Los Angeles where he spends most of his time writing as he cools off from recording the last episode of The Messenger. It's evident that the subject matter means a great deal to the 33-year-old Sudanese-American rapper, both as a Black man living in America and one with an African heritage he continues to maintain deep ties with. The conversation around Black bodies enduring various levels of violence is too urgent and present to ignore and this is why The Messenger is a timely and necessary cultural work.

Below, we talk with Bas aboutThe Messenger podcast, Black activism, growing up with parents who helped shape his political consciousness and the globalized body of Black pain.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

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