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Chadian Producer Afrotronix Wants to Redefine Afrobeat In His New Album

On his latest release Nomadix, the forward-thinking producer Afrotronix flaunts the different production styles he's acquired over the years.

DIASPORA—On his latest release Nomadix, the forward-thinking producer Afrotronix flaunts the different production styles he's acquired over the years. The Chadian-born, Montreal-based artist has a lot of influences that bleed through on his new album.


“This album is a good reflection of who I am,” says Afrotronix in an e-mail to OkayAfrica. “I sing in Sara, the language from my country Chad. I mix mandingo music from west Africa with Tuareg blues from the Sahara and present it in an electronic futurist package.”

Dubstep, house, reggae and EDM, are fused with Mbalakh rumba and sai on Nomadix, making the album a virtual journey around some parts of the world.

“I want to redefine the meaning of Afrobeat. I want to present a new Africa,” says the artist. All nine tracks on the album are different from each other. The vocals, which are sometimes digitally enhanced with effects on some songs, make it uniquely Chadian. You also won’t get enough of those guitar solos that are prevalent throughout the album. 🔥

Listen to Nomadix below and revisit our 2016 interview with Afrotronix here.

 

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Exclusive: This 2019 Documentary Takes You Inside Amapiano, South Africa's Popular House Music Subgenre

A new documentary titled 'SHAYA!' unpacks the popular Amapiano subgenre.

Sponsored content from Corona.

SHAYA!, a 26-minute documentary which we are premiering here, unpacks amapiano's origins and profiles some of the subgenre's key players such as Kabza De Small, JazziDisciples, MFR Souls, Mark Khoza and others.

Amapiano, also affectionately called "the yanos", is the new craze in the streets of South Africa. The house music subgenre started in the townships of Gauteng cities Pretoria and Johannesburg. It's now one of the most popular genres in the country. Even major artists like Samthing Soweto, DJ Maphorisa, Cassper Nyovest and DJ Tira, among others, have jumped on the bandwagon and released amapiano songs and even whole projects.

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Zlatan Drops New Song and Video 'Yeye Boyfriend'

Zlatan really wants you to get rid of your useless boyfriend.

Nigerian artist Zlatan drops a new single ahead of the release of his upcoming debut album Zanku: The Album.

On "Yeye Boyfriend" the popular "Zanku (Leg Work)" singer reasons for breaking up with time-wasting boyfriends (yeye is a humorous Yoruba term often used to describe someone as "useless" or "senseless"). The song is a change of pace for the artist, as it features him singing lightheartedly rather than delivering the grittier rap sound he's known for.

The comedic video sees the artist playing the role of a therapist to several failing couples. He calls his practice "Yeye Family Therapy." The video was shot by Visionary Pictures.

The artist also recently announced that he'll be linking up with Burna Boy soon for another collaboration called "Gbeku," which is the name of another dance the artist is popularizing. Judging by the undeniable critical and commercial success of "Killin' Dem," it's sure to be a memorable one.

The artist has featured on several tracks throughout the year, including "Shotan" with Tiwa Savage, and "Bum Bum" with Davido. Zanku: The Album is set to drop on November 1 and is now available for pre-order.

Watch the music video for "Yeye Boyfriend" below.

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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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Screenshot from the upcoming film Warriors of a Beautiful Game

In Conversation: Pelé's Daughter is Making a Documentary About Women's Soccer Around the World

In this exclusive interview, Kely Nascimento-DeLuca shares the story behind filming Warriors of a Beautiful Game in Tanzania, Brazil and other countries.

It may surprise you to know that women's soccer was illegal in Brazil until 1981. And in the UK until 1971. And in Germany until 1970. You may have read that Sudan made its first-ever women's league earlier this year. Whatever the case, women and soccer have always had a rocky relationship.

It wasn't what women wanted. It certainly wasn't what they needed. However, society had its own ideas and placed obstacle after obstacle in front of women to keep ladies from playing the game. Just this year the US national team has shown the world that women can be international champions in the sport and not get paid fairly compared to their male counterparts who lose.

Kely Nascimento-DeLuca is looking to change that. As the daughter of international soccer legend Pelé, she is no stranger to the game. Growing up surrounded by the sport, she was actually unaware of the experiences women around the world were having with it. It was only recently that she discovered the hardships around women in soccer and how much it mirrored women's rights more generally.

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