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Les Amazones d'Afrique. Photo: Karen Paulina Biswell

Les Amazones d'Afrique's New Video Showcases The Strength Of African Women

Watch our premiere of the new music video for "Mansa Soyari," featuring Mali's Rokia Koné.

Les Amazones d'Afrique is an all-female West African supergroup who released one of last year's most moving and socially-charged records, République Amazon.

The group's roster includes the likes of Beninese pop icon Angelique Kidjo, national Malian treasure, Kandia Kouyaté, vocal legend Mamani Keita, and Mariam Doumbia (of Amadou & Mariam).

Les Amazones d'Afrique are now sharing a new music video for album single "Mansa Soyari," a song about female empowerment on which Malian singer Rokia Koné takes center stage.

Though relatively unknown outside of Mali, her vocal delivery here proves that she's one to keep an eye on. It's no wonder she's earned the nickname La Rose de Bamako (The Rose of Bamako).


The music video for the song, which we're premiering here today, sees Rokia performing both at a Bamako nightclub and at home with her family.

"'Mansa Soyari' is a song about women. About African women seizing opportunity. Women's strength. Women's freedom. Women fighting for education," the band mentions . "Loosely translated as 'kingdom in movement,' the song refers an African queen from the past, when women held great power in Africa."

"Rokia urges women to take more responsibility and not to stay in the shadows. Look to the powerful women in history who headed kingdoms, who led the way as activists."

Upcoming Les Amazones d'Afrique tour dates will see Rokia Koné take the band's lead alongside singers Awa Sangho, Mamani Keita, Kani Sidibe and Sam Rawit.

Watch our premiere of "Mansa Soyari" below.







Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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