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Prêt-À-Poundo: ARISE Magazine's 100 Dynamic Women

ARISE magazine 100 Dynamic Women series with its first list on Dynamic Women — highlighting 100 influential women whose work shapes modern Africa.


ARISE magazine has launched its ARISE 100 series with its first list on Dynamic Women — highlighting 100 influential women whose works and actions across a gamut of disciplines, including politics, fashion, the arts, entertainment, sport and activism are shaping modern Africa today. 

The roll call includes such inspirational women as Nkosazana DlaminiZuma (chair of the African Union), Dambisa Moyo (economist), Ellen Johnson Sirleaf (President of Liberia), Iman (entrepreneur and supermodel), Leymah Gbowee (peace activist), Franca Sozzani (Editor-in-chief of Vogue Italia), Joyce Banda (President of Malawi), Fatou Bensouda (chief prosecutor of the International Criminal Court), Angélique Kidjo (singer and campaigner), Charlize Theron and Angelina Jolie (actresses), Oprah Winfrey (media mogul);,Sarah Brown (campaigner) and Melinda Gates (philanthropist).

Do you agree with the list? Who would you add or remove? Tell us in the comments.

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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