Audio

Audio: DJ Spooky "Ghost World: A Story in Sound"


Digital Africa is here people - but you knew that.  DJ Spooky that Subliminal Kid underlines the point with his newest mixtape Ghost World: A Story In Sound.

As Spooky says:

The "Ghost World" mix is all about the multiple rhythms and languages of Africa, but it makes no attempt to give you everything - it's from my record collection. That's why the "story" of the mix is about: polyrhythm, multiplex reality.

He goes in-depth on his blog about digging through his records and offering up rarities we'd certainly never heard of - one example being the "Car Horn Orchestra" of Ghana which has a gathering of many taxi drivers who converge in downtown Accra to make a large symphony of honks from their taxis at the end of the work day or for funerals of drivers.  Expect a mix full of other cool sounds you probably wouldn't anticipate.

Spooky spent time in Africa as a child, traveling through Kenya, Ivory Coast, Senegal, Egypt, and more recently visited Angola where he got turned on to Kuduro, which you'll hear in this mix as well.  More than a mix, this is an art project that accompanied Spooky's installation at the Venice Biennial Africa Pavilion.  Although we can't offer you the installation, we can give you the mix to listen to + download FREE!  Click after the jump for the FULL mega-mix tracklisting.

Listen to Ghost World - A Story in Sound below and on DJ Spooky's blog.



DOWNLOAD the mix here.

*For even more from DJ Spooky's subliminal world, follow him on twitter @djspooky

Africa Remix: Ghost World - A Story in Sound

Dj Spooky Presents a Project for the Dokolo Foundation at the Venice Biennial 2007

"In Africa, When an old man dies, it is like a library burning to the ground" a quote attributed to Leopold Senghor

Mega Mix!

Por Por Akwaaba Welcome! Car Horn Orchestra of Ghana

Intro: Lafayette Afro Rock Band "Darkest Light" mixed w/Max Roach and Abdullah Ibrahim "Streams of Consciousness" (NY and South Africa)

Intro collage

African Anarchist Radio

Malcolm X "The Roots of Savagery" mixed w/

Max Roach/Abdullah Ibrahim "Streams of Consciousness" (NY/South Africa)

Tony Allen "Crazy Afro Beat" w/scratches by Rob Swift Vs Dj Spooky (NY and Nigeria)

X Plastaz "Msimu kwa msimu" (Tanzania)

Alif "Douta Mbaye"(Senegal)

K'naan "Soobax" (Somalia)

Kelis "Trick Me" (dancehall mix) (USA)

Fela "Kalakuta Show" (Mix Master Mike, Lateef and The Gift of Gab Remix) (Nigeria)

Lotfi Double Kanon "Bled Miki" (Tunisia)

MC Solaar featuring Ron Carter "Un Ange En Danger" (France/Senegal)

Akon "Locked Up" mixed w/ Nelson Mandela "Moments in Black History (Brad Sanders)" (NY/Senegal/South Africa)

Angola National Anthem - "Angola, avante!" Author: Manuel Rui Alves Monteiro (b.1941); Composer: Rui Alberto Vieira Dias Mingao

Mixed w/Malcolm X "The Root of Civilization"

Dj Spooky featuring Tapper Zukie "Revolution Dub" (NY/Jamaica)

Frederic Galliano featuring Pancha Angola: Kuduru Sound System

Frederic Galliano featuring Pinta Tirru "Entra No Roda" (Angola/France)

Bunny Lee Meets King Tubby "African Roots and Reggae" - (Jamaica)

Cesoria Evora - Angola (original + Carl Craig remix) -Dj Spooky remix (Cape Verde Islands/Detroit/NY)

David Byrne and Brian Eno "My Life in The Bush of Ghosts: Vocal Outtakes" (New York/London)

Fela "Zombie" (Nigeria) (remix)

King Britt "Obafunke Theme" (Philadelphia) mixed w/

Interlude Idi Amin speaks (Uganda)

Orson Welles "Citizen Kane" (L.A.)

President Obasanjo mixed w/"Move" by J Dilla (Detroit)

Ryuichi Sakamoto "Riot in Lagos" mixed w/ Nigerian National Anthem (Japan/Nigeria)

Baka Forest People of South East Cameroon - Water Drums (Cameroon) mixed w/

Foday Musa Suso "World Wide Funk" (DJ Spooky remix) (Gambia)

Master Musicians of Jajouka featuring Talvin Singh "You Can Find the Feeling" mixed w/ Abdul Nasser "Independence Forever" (Morocco/Egypt/India)

Duke Ellington "Afro-Euraasian Eclipse" (NY)

Oum Kalthoum "Hob Eih" (Egypt) - Dj Spooky remix

Mixed w/Tectonic "Heat Sensor"

Charlie Dark "Afro Dreaming"(UK-Ghana)

The Monks of Keur Moussa "Nous Te Louons, Pere Invisible" (Senegal)

Ginger Baker/Tony Allen (UK/Nigeria) - drum solo mixed w/

Drexciya "Polymono Plexusgel" (Detroit)

Zimbabwe Legit "Shadows Legit Mix" Dj Shadow remix (Zimbabwe/San Francisco)

Soweto Gospel Choir "Rivers of Babylon" (South Africa)

Konono No1 "Kule Kule" (Congo)

Abdullah Ibrahim "Mindif" (Dj Spooky remix) (South Africa/NY)

 

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