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Photo by Kevin Mazur.

Finally, Beyoncé (and Jay-Z) Is Coming To South Africa, Here’s Everything You Need To Know

This is not a drill!

If you are exposed to South African Twitter, you know the theory: Beyoncé is capable of anything, except coming to (South) Africa. The artist last performed in the country in 2004, during Nelson Mandela's 46664 concert.

Where and When?

Well, the good news is that Queen B is finally headed to South Africa on the 2nd of December at FNB Stadium, in Johannesburg. Queen B and JAY-Z will be headlining the Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100. Joining the mega stars on the concert's line-up are South African hip-hop sensations, Cassper Nyovest and Sho Madjozi, alongside D'banj, Ed Sheeran, Eddie Vedder, Femi Kuti, Pharrell Williams & Chris Martin, Tiwa Savage, Usher and Wizkid.


What Is "Mandela 100"?

The festival is the culmination of Global Citizen's "Mandela 100" campaign in partnership with the House of Mandela; a series of global events honoring the life and legacy of Apartheid struggle hero and former president of South Africa, Nelson Mandela in his centenary year.Oprah Winfrey will deliver a special keynote address remembering Nelson Mandela and his legacy during the event, which will be hosted by Naomi Campbell, Sir Bob Geldof, Gayle King, Tyler Perry and Forest Whitaker.


Free Entrance!

Activists and music fans can begin to earn their free tickets starting on August 21st and can sign up today at the Global Citizen website, demanding world leaders make major investments to end extreme poverty and take a stand for women and girls.

Interview
Photo: Benoit Peverelli

Interview: Oumou Sangaré Proves Why She's the Songbird of Wassoulou

We caught up with the Malian singer to talk about her new Acoustic album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

When Oumou Sangaré tells me freedom is at her core, I am not surprised. If you listen to her discography, you'll be hard-pressed to find a song that doesn't center or in some way touch on women's rights or child abuse. The Grammy award-winning Malian singer has spent a significant part of her career using her voice to fight for the rights of women across Africa and the world, a testimony to this is her naming her debut studio album Moussolou, meaning Woman. The album, a pure masterpiece that solidified Oumou's place amongst the greats and earned her the name 'Songbird of Wassoulou,' was a commercial success selling over 250,000 records in Africa and would in turn go on to inspire other singers across the world.

On her latest body of work Acoustic, a reworking of her critically acclaimed 2017 album Mogoya, Oumou Sangaré proves how and why she earned her accolades. The entirety of the 11-track album was recorded within two days in the Midi Live studio in Villetaneuse in 'live' conditions—with no amplification, no retakes or overdubs, no headphones. Throughout the album, using her powerful and raw voice that has come to define feminism in Africa and shaped opinions across the continent, Oumou boldly addresses themes like loss, polygamy and female circumcision.

We caught up with the Malian singer at the studio she is staying while in quarantine to talk about her new album, longevity as an artist, and growing up in Mali.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity.

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