Photos

'The Biker Gents of Lagos' Chronicled In The Sauvage, A New African Men's Style Blog

Emerging African male style blog The Sauavage followed the Biker Gents of Lagos as they drove their café racers around the Lekki Penninsula.

Words by Rashaad Denzel & Alyssa Klein


The Sauvage is an emerging African male style blog that made its official debut last month. The publication promises to serve as an online destination for fashion and lifestyle for the "Afropolitan" man. "There’s no form of representation for the black African man," said a welcoming note from the site's editor posted August 8th. The letter explained:

"We’re not in GQ, and we’re not in Vice, and we’re certainly not in Vogue. And we aren’t catered to by any of the local blogging or magazine giants. We’re not on bellanaija, and we’re not on Linda Ikeji, and even though the African fashion industry is rising, there’s nothing for us. I mean, where would you go if you wanted a good suit by an African designer? Or what if you like pink suits, and yellow socks, but no one else around you does, so they all tell you that it’s wrong. You wouldn’t know that there was another person two countries away that was into the same things as you. There is a way that the modern African man likes to look: well put together, sleek, and dandy as hell, and this is grand. It’s brilliant! It’s fantastic! But several African men don’t know how to achieve this foppish grandeur. And what of the others? The sub cultures that have formed as a result of globalisation? Are they not valid too?"

For their very first feature, the writers at The Sauvage followed industrial product designer Funfere Koroye (of the blog Fusion Kelvar) and Oluwapelumi Alabi (of the Nigerian style blog Urbane Hanger)– aka the Biker Gents of Lagos– as they drove their café racers (motor bikes) around the Lekki Peninsula. Koroye and Alabi are not your typical motorcyclist– they're café riders. "Cafe racers are very well suited to the urbane gentleman in Lagos," writes The Sauvage. "...they’re affordable, reliable and best of all they’re visually appealing. The café racers perfect disguises for the lifestyles of young professionals who want to conceal their lack of funds and ride in style. They’re stripped down versions of the Ducatis and Kawasakis, but they’re often just as ferocious and powerful." See the full photo series in the gallery above. Follow The Sauvage on Facebook and Instagram for more fresh looks.

>>>Read "The Biker Gents of Lagos" In The Sauvage

Interview
Photo: Shawn Theodore via Schure Media Group/Roc Nation

Interview: Buju Banton Is a Lyrical Purveyor of African Truth

A candid conversation with the Jamaican icon about his new album, Upside Down 2020, his influence on afrobeats, and the new generation of dancehall.

Devout fans of reggae music have been longing for new musical offerings from Mark Anthony Myrie, widely-known as the iconic reggae superstar Buju Banton. A shining son of Jamaican soil, with humble beginnings as one of 15 siblings in the close-knit community of Salt Lane, Kingston, the 46-year-old musician is now a legend in his own right.

Buju Banton has 12 albums under his belt, one Grammy Award win for Best Reggae Album, numerous classic hits and a 30-year domination of the industry. His larger-than-life persona, however, is more than just the string of accolades that follow in the shadows of his career. It is his dutiful, authentic style of Caribbean storytelling that has captured the minds and hearts of those who have joined him on this long career ride.

The current socio-economic climate of uncertainty that the COVID-19 pandemic has thrusted onto the world, coupled with the intensified fight against racism throughout the diaspora, have taken centre stage within the last few months. Indubitably, this makes Buju—and by extension, his new album—a timely and familiar voice of reason in a revolution that has called for creative evolution.

With his highly-anticipated album, Upside Down 2020, the stage is set for Gargamel. The title of this latest discography feels nothing short of serendipitous, and with tracks such as "Memories" featuring John Legend and the follow-up dancehall single "Blessed," it's clear that this latest body of work is a rare gem that speaks truth to vision and celebrates our polylithic African heritage in its rich fullness and complexities.

Having had an exclusive listen to some other tracks on the album back in April, our candid one-on-one conversation with Buju Banton journeys through his inspiration, collaboration and direction for Upside Down 2020, African cultural linkages and the next generational wave of dancehall and reggae.

This interview has been shortened and edited for clarity.

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