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Watch The Story Of Black Coffee's 'Origins' In A New Mini-Doc From RA & SONOS

South African house DJ/producer Black Coffee releases "We Are One," plus features in Resident Advisor and SONOS' 'Origins' mini documentary.


A few months after bringing South African house music to Central Park, NYC for our very own Summerstage concert, SA DJ/producer Black Coffee has come through this week with the first single off his forthcoming sixth LP, due out next year. "I Will Find You," like "Stimela" and the Masekela-featuring "We Are One" did previously, has a subtle kind of power. Instead of screaming for attention, the song sidles up to the listener with soft drum clasps, thick background beats, and the menacing, albeit comforting voice of SA singer Cara Frew. At its core, "I Will Find You" is an impassioned, almost desperate address. Yet, with Black Coffee's trance-like production, the song manages to be inviting, even fun. Listen below.

In addition to the new single, Black Coffee also features in a new 21-minute documentary collaboration between Resident Advisor and SONOS for their ORIGINS series. A gripping portrait of childhood hardship, personal resilience, and eventual happiness, the film follows the artist as he travels to his birthplace of Durban and then to Mthatha (his later home), where he recounts the traumatic incident that set him back, but also strenghtened his love of music. Culminating in a return to his former school, the doc can be summarized in Black Coffee's address to the students before him: "You can be anything you want in life. And I'm not just saying that. I'm the proof of it." Watch it below and head to RA for more details on the film.

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(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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