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Watch the Trailer for BBC & Netflix Thriller 'Black Earth Rising' Starring Michaela Coel

The "Chewing Gum" creator plays Kate Ashby, an adopted woman who was rescued as a child during the Rwandan genocide.

The trailer for BBC Two and Netflix's international thriller, Black Earth Rising, is here.

Starring Michaela Coel and John Goodman, the eight-part drama series intricately addresses the personal, legal and political turmoil ignited by the prosecution of international war crimes, as well as the West's relationship with the continent in the modern era.

From BBC's synopsis, the series—written, directed and produced by BAFTA-winner Hugo Blick—centers on Kate Ashby (Coel) who was rescued as a young child during the Rwandan genocide and adopted by Eve Ashby (Harriet Walter), a world class British prosecutor in international criminal law.

Kate was raised in Britain and now that she's in her late 20s, works as a legal investigator in the law chambers of Michael Ennis (Goodman). When Eve takes on a case at the International Criminal Court that seeks to prosecute an African militia leader, the story explodes—pulling Michael and Kate into a journey that will change their lives forever.

Watch the trailer below.


Black Earth Rising also stars South African-British actor Noma Dumezweni, Tamara Tunie, Tanzanian-British actor Lucian Msamati and Abena Ayvior, who hails from Ghana, Zambia and South Africa.

BBC Two will broadcast in the UK as Netflix will stream internationally outside the UK. The series is due to drop later this year.

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(Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

Pregnant Tanzanian Girls Now Have Hope Of An Education

In the past, Tanzania's pregnant girls of school-going age were banned from accessing an education. However, things are about to change!

If a young girl of school-going age happened to fall pregnant in Tanzania, it usually spelled the end of her schooling career — and the death of any prospects she may have had for a bright future. In Tanzania currently, an estimated 5 500 girls are forced to leave school each year due to pregnancy, according to the World Bank.

The Tanzanian government has announced a new programme aimed at addressing the plight of young girls who have been impacted by this discriminatory ban. Tanzania's Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Leonard Akwilapo said young girls will now be offered an opportunity to further their schooling at alternative colleges.

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Photo by Cheriss May/NurPhoto via Getty Images.

Nigerian Government Barred From Prosecuting Twitter Users

The Court of Justice of the Economic Community of West African States has ordered the Nigerian government to refrain from prosecuting Twitter users, while it considers the case brought to it by civil society organisations and journalists.

Activists and journalists took the Nigerian government to court to challenge the recent Twitter ban, asking "the court to declare the indefinite suspension of Twitter a continuous violation of their human rights under the international law." As it stands the ban threatens to criminalise the 40 million Twitter users in the country.

According to Socio-Economic Rights And Accountability Project (SERAP), a Nigerian NGO, the court ruled that no person should be "sanctioned, harassed, intimidated, arrested or prosecuted for using Twitter in Nigeria.The ruling also means that tech companies must immediately restore people's access to Twitter as a matter of human right."

"The court has listened very well to the objection by Nigeria. Any interference with Twitter is viewed as inference with human rights. This will violate human rights. Nigeria must take immediate steps to implement this order," the court ruling stated.

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Photo by Deon Raath/Rapport/Gallo Images via Getty Images

Spirit Of Humanity Gives Hope To Young Boy Mauled By A Hyena

A 9-year-old Zimbabwean boy Rodwell Nkomazana has a shot at a normal life, again, after a horrific hyena attack left him with half of his face missing.

It takes a village to raise a child and sometimes that village comes from thousands of kilometers away, and consists of committed surgeons, passionate nurses and generous international donors. Nine-year-old Rodwell Nkomazana was asleep at an all-night church service when the unthinkable happened. The little boy was attacked and mauled by a hyena outside Harare, in Zimbabwe.

The medical team at Parirenyatwa Hospital in Harare, where he received his initial treatment, did all they could to save his life and stabilise him. However, due to a lack of resources and expertise, it was all they could do.

With half of his face missing, including an eye, his upper lip, his nose and part of his forehead, Rodwell was set for a life full of challenges. Not only would he have lost his childhood, but he would have probably spent most of his time in seclusion — isolated from the rest of society.

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Africa Could Start Producing COVID-19 Vaccines In 9 Months

While Western countries are speeding ahead with their vaccination programmes, Africa and the rest of the global South are still lagging far behind. Not for too long if all goes well according to the World Health Organisation!