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Watch Blick Bassy's Striking New Video For 'Woñi'

PREMIERE: The new music video focuses on the continuing strains of neocolonialism in Cameroon and the need for escape through vice.

Blick Bassy is readying the release of his new album, 1958, a follow-up to 2015's Akö.

The modern Cameroonian griot's new full-length follows Bassy as he delivers striking tributes to those who fought for Cameroon's independence, like anti-colonialist leader Ruben Um Nyobè, and the search for true identity, all sung in the Bassa language.

His new album title, 1958, marks the year that Um Nyobè was murdered by the French army after leading the Union des Populations du Cameroun (UPC).

Today, we're premiering the Cameroonian songwriter's beautiful and reflective new music video for "Woñi," which focuses on the continuing strains of neocolonialism and the need for escape through vices like alcohol.

"When people are disconnected and cut off from their history, imbalance and emptiness set in, leaving room for fear," Bassy tells OkayAfrica. "Vice becomes the only means of survival. This is what is happening to my people, who are just trying to survive. Some turn to alcohol as escape."


"I would like to talk about the feeling of fear that prevailed and still prevails around our colonial history, that contributed to the development of the tribal clichés, and that, today, alters our country," the artist also mentions. "That is also because of that fear that nobody dares to stand up to demonstrate or to fight for our freedom. My family grew up in fear. Men, women and children live in fear, and to exist, this beautiful community is getting drunk with alcohol, with fear, uprooted, under the astounded eyes of the ancestors."

Watch our premiere of "Woñi" below. Blick Bassy's 1958 album is out tomorrow June 21 via No Format/Tôt ou Tard/IDOL.

Blick Bassy - Woñi (Official video) youtu.be

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Photo by Claudio Villa/Getty Images

Cameroonian Soccer Legend Samuel Eto'o is Off to Harvard University

The now retired soccer legend says he wants to use his studies at Harvard to 'give back to Africa'.

Cameroonian soccer legend Samuel Eto'o is off to study business management at the prestigious Harvard Business School at the beginning of next year.

After announcing his retirement in September of this year, the 38-year-old four-time African Player of the Year has set his sights on giving back to the African continent and contributing to its transformation through studying. According to BBC Sport, Eto'o will take up residence in Boston for a year and is looking forward to the new challenge.

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(Photo by Jemal Countess/Getty Images for Global Citizen Festival: Mandela 100)

Tiwa Savage, Sauti Sol, 2Baba, Toofan & More to Perform at AFRIMA Music Village Festival

The star-studded event will take place ahead of the award show and includes a host of artists from across the continent.

The 6th annual All Africa Music Awards (AFRIMA) celebrations, which recognize African talent from across the continent, are set to take place between November 20-23 in Lagos, Nigeria. Several events will take place ahead of the award show, including the star-studded AFRIMA Music Village Festival which will feature performances from some of the top artists in the industry.

The show's lineup has just been announced and it features over 30 acts from all regions of the continent.

The AFRIMAs once again are not to be confused with the AFRIMMAs (African Muzik Magazine Awards) which took place in Dallas, Texas in October.

UPDATE: See the full list of AFRIMA 2019 winners here.

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Photo by Lana Haroun

From #FeesMustFall to #BlueforSudan: OkayAfrica's Guide to a Decade of African Hashtag Activism

The 2010s saw protest movements across the continent embrace social media in their quest to make change.

The Internet and its persistent, attention-seeking child, Social Media has changed the way we live, think and interact on a daily basis. But as this decade comes to a close, we want to highlight the ways in which people have merged digital technology, social media and ingenuity to fight for change using one of the world's newest and most potent devices—the hashtag.

What used to simply be the "pound sign," the beginning of a tic-tac-toe game or what you'd have to enter when interacting with an automated telephone service, the hashtag has become a vital aspect of the digital sphere operating with both form and function. What began in 2007 as a metadata tag used to categorize and group content on social media, the term 'hashtag' has now grown to refer to memes (#GeraraHere), movements (#AmINext), events (#InsertFriendsWeddingHere) and is often used in everyday conversation ("That situation was hashtag awkward").

The power of the hashtag in the mobility of people and ideas truly came to light during the #ArabSpring, which began one year into the new decade. As Tunisia kicked off a revolution against oppressive regimes that spread throughout North Africa and the Middle East, Twitter, Instagram and Facebook played a crucial role in the development and progress of the movements. The hashtag, however, helped for activists, journalists and supporters of causes. It not only helped to source information quickly, but it also acted as a way to create a motto, a war cry, that could spread farther and faster than protestors own voices and faster than a broadcasted news cycle. As The Guardian wrote in 2016, "At times during 2011, the term Arab Spring became interchangeable with 'Twitter uprising' or 'Facebook revolution,' as global media tried to make sense of what was going on."

From there, the hashtag grew to be omnipresent in modern society. It has given us global news, as well as strong comedic relief and continues to play a crucial role in our lives. As the decade comes to a close, here are some of the most impactful hashtags from Africans and for Africans that used the medium well.

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Screenshot from the upcoming film Warriors of a Beautiful Game

In Conversation: Pelé's Daughter is Making a Documentary About Women's Soccer Around the World

In this exclusive interview, Kely Nascimento-DeLuca shares the story behind filming Warriors of a Beautiful Game in Tanzania, Brazil and other countries.

It may surprise you to know that women's soccer was illegal in Brazil until 1981. And in the UK until 1971. And in Germany until 1970. You may have read that Sudan made its first-ever women's league earlier this year. Whatever the case, women and soccer have always had a rocky relationship.

It wasn't what women wanted. It certainly wasn't what they needed. However, society had its own ideas and placed obstacle after obstacle in front of women to keep ladies from playing the game. Just this year the US national team has shown the world that women can be international champions in the sport and not get paid fairly compared to their male counterparts who lose.

Kely Nascimento-DeLuca is looking to change that. As the daughter of international soccer legend Pelé, she is no stranger to the game. Growing up surrounded by the sport, she was actually unaware of the experiences women around the world were having with it. It was only recently that she discovered the hardships around women in soccer and how much it mirrored women's rights more generally.

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