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BLKKANGAROO Shares "Afro-Kabuki" Streetwear Editorial

Toronto-based streetwear label BLKKANGAROO shares an "Afro-Kabuki" fashion editorial from creative duo Tinashe Musara and Andy Long Hoang.

According to their brand statement, Toronto-based streetwear label BLKKANGAROO "fuses an African sensibility with a dose of pop culture." The company traces its launch to the 2012 Afropunk Fest, when Nigerian designer Seye Ogunlesi began selling his If found return to the Motherland t-shirts out of his backpack. Since then, the operation has expanded into a team of three, with Ogunlesi joined by Emmanuel Obayemi as art director and Nick Bahizi as fashion director.


Back in December the label unveiled its Spring/Summer 2015 BLKKMARKET line of graphic prints, jersey-inspired tops, cropped pants and colorful rope sandals inspired by the "African market experience." "The BLKKMARKET collection has everything to do with my trip to Lagos and Accra last year," Ogunlesi says. "I noticed that people were almost always transporting something to be sold - on their heads, on the back of an Okada, in a jerry can, in the ubiquitous BAGCO super sac or the iconic tartan print 'Ghana must go' bags. Africans are the world’s most resourceful people. We are always on the go, commerce is always on our minds, and BLKKMARKET is our hommage to that."

For their latest editorial, creative duo Tinashe Musara and Andy Long Hoang revisit the Spring/Summer 2015 BLKKMARKET collection with an "Afro-Kabuki"-themed series entitled HOME TEAM. See the new photo editorial along with the original BLKKMARKET lookbook in the gallery above. Keep up with BLKKANGAROO on Facebook, Twitter, and Tumblr.

Photo by Meztli Yoalli Rodríguez

Dying Lagoons Reveal Mexico’s Environmental Racism

In the heart of a traditionally Black and Indigenous use area in Southwest Mexico, decades of environmental destruction now threatens the existence of these communities.

On an early morning in September 2017, in a little fishing village in the Pacific coast of Oaxaca, called Zapotalito, thousands of dead fish floated on the surface of the Chacahua-Pastoría lagoons. A 7.1-magnitude earthquake, which rattled Mexico City on September 19, was felt as far down as Zapotalito, and the very next morning, its Black, Indigenous and poor Mestizo residents, who depend on the area's handful of lagoons for food and commerce, woke up to an awful smell and that terrible scene of floating fish.

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