Arts + Culture

The Anti-World Cup Graffiti Popping Up On Brazilian Streets

Look at our collection of anti-world cup and anti-FIFA graffiti protesting the Brazil 2014 World Cup.

With the 2014 World Cup taking place in less than two weeks, anti-government sentiment among the Brazilian people has reached a fever pitch.  The glaring need for social infrastructure in the education, healthcare and transportation sectors of Brazil has been supplanted in the name of giving a facelift to the 12 cities where matches are to be held. The Brazilian taxpayers’ fear of being stuck with the World Cup's $11 billion price tag has been realized most noticeably with an increase in the cost of living since winning the hosting bid in 2007.


In addition to uncompleted development projects, events surrounding Brazil 2014 have been marred by the Brazilian government’s gross mismanagement of funds meant for urban redevelopment (which has been questioned time  and again) , limitations placed on small businesses in favor of corporate sponsors like Coke and McDonalds, the marginalization of Afro-Brazilianspolice brutality and forceful evictions in an increasingly overpriced housing market that has left thousands of Brazilians, including indigenous communities in limbo.

In protest, Brazilians have utilized multiple means of social activism and organizing to ensure that their discontent with the government’s extravagance does not go unnoticed — political graffiti being one of them. Street artists have taken the realities of the Brazilian people in the run up to the World Cup and transformed them into compelling images which cannot be ignored by the thousands of tourists who will soon be descending on their country. Click through the gallery above for a sampling of a few of the murals that sum up the popular feelings of Brazilians towards the World Cup.

[All images via r/graffiti]

News

Modern Pharaoh's Rugby Snapbacks For Kenya & South Africa

Liberian creative Adam Smarte's Modern Pharaoh lifestyle brand Modern Pharaoh reveals classic rugby snapbacks for South Africa and Kenya.

Words by Alyssa Klein & Netzayet Itzea

Keep reading...
Arts + Culture

The Anti-World Cup Graffiti Popping Up On Brazilian Streets Pt. 2

A gallery of murals by street artists in protest of the Brazil 2014 World Cup

As Brazil scrambles to ready infrastructure on the the eve of the 2014 World Cup, the host nation's embattled president Dilma Roussef believes that her country is fully prepared to host football's largest tournament despite all evidence to the contrary. With daily strike threats from transportation union leaders and reports that construction workers are still installing seating inside São Paulo's Corinthians Arena, where the opening match between the host nation and Croatia is set to take place, it comes as no surprise that 61% of Brazil's population is staunchly anti-World Cup. We covered these popular feelings a few weeks ago with the first installment of our anti-World Cup graffiti gallery, and now, more street murals that capture the frustrations of millions of Brazilians have surfaced online. Click through the gallery above to view more of the anti-FIFA graffiti popping up ahead of Brazil 2014.

popular
Photo courtesy of CSA Global.

In Conversation with Congolese NBA Player Emmanuel Mudiay: 'I want more African players in the NBA.'

The Utah Jazz player talks about being African in the NBA, supporting basketball in the DRC and how 'everybody knows about Burna Boy'.

Inspired by his basketball-playing older brothers, by second grade, Emmanuel Mudiay already knew that he wanted to play in the American National Basketball Association. Then in 2001 his family, fleeing the war in Democratic Republic of Congo, sought asylum in the United States.

In America, Mudiay saw basketball as a way for him to improve his situation. After impressive high school and college careers, he moved to China to play pro ball. Picked 7th overall in the 2015 NBA draft, the now 23-year-old guard has made a name for himself this season coming off the bench for the Utah Jazz.

Mudiay attests to the sport having changed not only his life but that of his siblings. Basketball gave them all a chance at a good education and the opportunity to dream without conditions. Now he wants to see other talented African players make it too.

We caught up with him to talk about his experience as an African player in the NBA, his hopes for basketball on the African continent and who he and his teammates jam out to in their locker rooms.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Keep reading...
popular

University lecturer and activist Doctor Stella Nyanzi (L) reacts in court as she attends a trial to face charges for cyber-harassment and offensives communication, in Kampala, on April 10, 2017. (Photo by GAEL GRILHOT/AFP via Getty Images)

Jailed Ugandan Activist, Stella Nyanzi, Wins PEN Prize for Freedom of Expression

The outspoken activist, who is currently serving a prison sentence for a poem she wrote about the president's mother's vagina, won for her resistance "in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her."

Stella Nyanzi, the Ugandan academic, activist, and vocal critic of President Yoweri Museveni has been awarded the 2020 Oxfam Novib/PEN International award for freedom of expression, given to writers who "continue to work for freedom of expression in the face of persecution."

Nyanzi is currently serving a 15 month sentence for "cyber harassment" after she published a poem in which she wrote that she wished "the acidic pus flooding Esiteri's (the president's mother) vaginal canal had burn up your unborn fetus. Burn you up as badly as you have corroded all morality and professionalism out of our public institutions in Uganda."

According to the director of PEN International, Carles Torner, her unfiltered outspokenness around the issues facing her country is what earned her the award. "For her, writing is a permanent form of resistance in front of a regime that is trying to suppress her," said Torner at the award ceremony.

Keep reading...

get okayafrica in your inbox

news.