Arts + Culture

The Anti-World Cup Graffiti Popping Up On Brazilian Streets

Look at our collection of anti-world cup and anti-FIFA graffiti protesting the Brazil 2014 World Cup.

With the 2014 World Cup taking place in less than two weeks, anti-government sentiment among the Brazilian people has reached a fever pitch.  The glaring need for social infrastructure in the education, healthcare and transportation sectors of Brazil has been supplanted in the name of giving a facelift to the 12 cities where matches are to be held. The Brazilian taxpayers’ fear of being stuck with the World Cup's $11 billion price tag has been realized most noticeably with an increase in the cost of living since winning the hosting bid in 2007.


In addition to uncompleted development projects, events surrounding Brazil 2014 have been marred by the Brazilian government’s gross mismanagement of funds meant for urban redevelopment (which has been questioned time  and again) , limitations placed on small businesses in favor of corporate sponsors like Coke and McDonalds, the marginalization of Afro-Brazilianspolice brutality and forceful evictions in an increasingly overpriced housing market that has left thousands of Brazilians, including indigenous communities in limbo.

In protest, Brazilians have utilized multiple means of social activism and organizing to ensure that their discontent with the government’s extravagance does not go unnoticed — political graffiti being one of them. Street artists have taken the realities of the Brazilian people in the run up to the World Cup and transformed them into compelling images which cannot be ignored by the thousands of tourists who will soon be descending on their country. Click through the gallery above for a sampling of a few of the murals that sum up the popular feelings of Brazilians towards the World Cup.

[All images via r/graffiti]

Interview

Interview: Bizzle Osikoya Is the A&R Shaping the Voice of a New Generation

We caught up with the A&R expert and co-founder of The Plug Management to talk about the fast-rising demand for Nigerian music and what it takes to break out as an artist.

The meteoric rise of Nigeria's burgeoning music industry over the last few years is definitely one for the books. From high profile collaborations that have graced international charts to appearances on American late night TV and a Grammy nomination, the Nigerian sound is sitting at the epicenter of a global conversation that the world—including Queen Bey herself —seem to scrabbling to get a piece of the action.

However, way before this global infiltration and westernized conflation of Africa's assortment of genres into one Afrobeats, Bizzle Osikoya was studying Music Business in England and plotting for a way to be a part of what he knew was inevitable. "I remember going to clubs in school and they would always play Jamaican music but rarely Nigerian songs. I knew we made good music here but I knew I couldn't sing. So I was motivated to come back, go behind the scenes, and see how we can make that crossover possible," he tells OkayAfrica.

More than a decade after making the intrepid decision to venture into A&R, helping artists find and develop their sound, Bizzle's creative genius has cascaded across different musical generations, from the piracy rife CD mix era with artists like Naeto C, Wande Coal and Dr. Sid to a streaming era populated with hits from Reekado Banks, Tiwa Savage and Davido.

Following the success of his latest project, Oxlade's Oxygene, we caught up with the A&R expert and co-founder of the Plug Management—a talent management company that has managed Davido, Peruzzi and DJ Obi—to talk about what it takes to break out as an artist, the fast-rising demand for Nigerian music, and how "alté" is not the same thing as alternative music.

Keep reading... Show less

get okayafrica in your inbox

popular.

In Photos: 'Covid' is Cape Town's New Informal Settlement for Those Displaced by the Pandemic

Cape Town residents whose livelihoods are impacted by the coronavirus pandemic are building new homes in a place they call 'Covid'.