ByLwansta Recounts a Robbery in New Single 'The Bike Song' from Upcoming EP SPIJØNGET (Chapter Two)

Listen to ByLwansta's new single 'The Bike Song.'

It's officially SPIJØNGET season. South African rapper ByLwansta's series of EPs is about to get a second iteration of its slates three. In "The Bike Song," ByLwansta recounts the tale of getting mugged in Joburg, which the rapper went through three weeks before the creation of the song in Berlin in August 2019 while he was on a residency program hosted by the Pop-Kultur Festival. The song was produced by German electronic music producer Robert Koch.


ByLwansta is known for using his music as therapy—most of what he's going through is documented in his rich catalog of projects. In "The Bike Song," he deliberately (or not) creates a juxtaposition between the liberating feeling that comes with cycling (presumably in Berlin) and, well, getting mugged on your way to take a bus in Joburg. His opening lines are polarizing:

"I just rode a bike, I just rode a bike/ I was like, feeling really good, I was feeling nice/ Saw my life flash before my eyes just the other night/ I was fuckin' terrified, man I'd almost swear that I died"

His delivery is sharp as ever, with his message being nested in complicated rhyme schemes and delivered with emotion and personality.

"The Bike Song" is the first song from SPIJØNGET (Chapter Two), which is a follow-up to SPIJØNGET (Chapter One) which was released March last year.

Stream "The Bike Song" below:


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