Cassper Nyovest. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Cassper Nyovest’s Verse on Frank Casino’s ‘Sudden’ Is Pure Heat

Well done, Nyovest!

Frank Casino's new EP, Heroes of Tomorrow, came out today. The four-track project sees the East Rand MC doing what he does best, and that's drippin' that sauce with his commanding voice over growling 808s.

Frank is potent throughout, but the highlight of the project is Cassper Nyovest's guest verse on the closing song "Sudden," which also features Major League.


Every now and then, Nyovest reminds heads that he is indeed a skilled rapper (think the last verse of "Ngiyekeleni" and the songs "I Hope You Bought It" and "Tsibip," among others).

Frank Casino feat Cassper Nyovest -Sudden (Official Audio) www.youtube.com

This new verse is one of those instances. The man drops fact after fact with an unmatched flair, rhyming syllables and hitting mid and end rhymes like it's not a thing. He sounds comfortable and raps with a charisma that matches his stature.

He reminds us of his accolades, which make him years ahead of everyone. He raps, "Niggas is up in their feelings/ I can't relate, boy, I'm chillin'/ Stadium status, status/ I'm 'bout to fill up Mabhida/ Counting my racks with my feet up," and "They used to sleep on my rhymes, now I'm sleeping on silk/ I'm getting better with time, y'all niggas aging like milk."

He also responds to those who feel he's not hip-hop enough because of his preference to rap over kwaito beats on songs like "Getsa Getsa 2.0" and "Hase Mo States." Emtee will feel that shit. Cass raps:

"Boardrooms with my pants down/ Niggas know I'm the benchmark/ All my albums went platinum/ Own' em all 'cause I'm damn smart/ Niggas saying I'm a dancer/ Benylin ya le tsentša."

Listen to the whole thing (sorry, couldn't help it) below and/or download it here.

Purchase a ticket to Cassper Nyovest's Fill Up Moses Mabhida Stadium, taking place in Durban on the 1st of December, here.

This Is What Cassper Nyovest's Fill Up FNB Stadium Felt Like

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Photo: Alvin Ukpeh.

The Year Is 2020 & the Future of Nigeria Is the Youth

We discuss the strength in resolve of Nigeria's youth, their use of social media to speak up, and the young digital platforms circumventing the legacy media propaganda machine. We also get first-hand accounts from young creatives on being extorted by SARS and why they believe the protests are so important.

In the midst of a pandemic-rife 2020, the voices of African youth have gotten louder in demand for a better present and future. From structural reforms, women's rights, LGBTQ rights, and derelict states of public service, the youths have amplified their voices via the internet and social media, to cohesively express grievances that would hitherto have been quelled at a whisper.

Nigerian youth have used the internet and social media to create and sustain a loud voice for themselves. The expression of frustration and the calls for change may have started online, but it's having a profound effect on the lives of every Nigerian with each passing day. What started as the twitter hashtag #EndSARS has grown into a nationwide youth revolution led by the people.

Even after the government supposedly disbanded the SARS (Special Anti-Robbery Squad) unit on the 10th of October, young Nigerians have not relented in their demands for better policing. The lack of trust for government promises has kept the youth protesting on the streets and online.

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