Cassper Nyovest. Photo by Sabelo Mkhabela.

Cassper Nyovest’s Verse on Frank Casino’s ‘Sudden’ Is Pure Heat

Well done, Nyovest!

Frank Casino's new EP, Heroes of Tomorrow, came out today. The four-track project sees the East Rand MC doing what he does best, and that's drippin' that sauce with his commanding voice over growling 808s.

Frank is potent throughout, but the highlight of the project is Cassper Nyovest's guest verse on the closing song "Sudden," which also features Major League.


Every now and then, Nyovest reminds heads that he is indeed a skilled rapper (think the last verse of "Ngiyekeleni" and the songs "I Hope You Bought It" and "Tsibip," among others).

Frank Casino feat Cassper Nyovest -Sudden (Official Audio) www.youtube.com

This new verse is one of those instances. The man drops fact after fact with an unmatched flair, rhyming syllables and hitting mid and end rhymes like it's not a thing. He sounds comfortable and raps with a charisma that matches his stature.

He reminds us of his accolades, which make him years ahead of everyone. He raps, "Niggas is up in their feelings/ I can't relate, boy, I'm chillin'/ Stadium status, status/ I'm 'bout to fill up Mabhida/ Counting my racks with my feet up," and "They used to sleep on my rhymes, now I'm sleeping on silk/ I'm getting better with time, y'all niggas aging like milk."

He also responds to those who feel he's not hip-hop enough because of his preference to rap over kwaito beats on songs like "Getsa Getsa 2.0" and "Hase Mo States." Emtee will feel that shit. Cass raps:

"Boardrooms with my pants down/ Niggas know I'm the benchmark/ All my albums went platinum/ Own' em all 'cause I'm damn smart/ Niggas saying I'm a dancer/ Benylin ya le tsentša."

Listen to the whole thing (sorry, couldn't help it) below and/or download it here.

Purchase a ticket to Cassper Nyovest's Fill Up Moses Mabhida Stadium, taking place in Durban on the 1st of December, here.

This Is What Cassper Nyovest's Fill Up FNB Stadium Felt Like

Music
Photo by Don Paulsen/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

Hugh Masekela's New York City Legacy

A look back at the South African legend's time in New York City and his enduring presence in the Big Apple.

In Questlove's magnificent documentary, Summer of Soul, he captures a forgotten part of Black American music history. But in telling the tale of the 1969 Harlem Cultural Festival, the longtime musician and first-time filmmaker also captures a part of lost South African music history too.

Among the line-up of blossoming all-stars who played the Harlem festival, from a 19-year-old Stevie Wonder to a transcendent Mavis Staples, was a young Hugh Masekela. 30 years old at the time, he was riding the wave of success that came from releasing Grazing in the Grass the year before. To watch Masekela in that moment on that stage is to see him at the height of his time in New York City — a firecracker musician who entertained his audiences as much as he educated them about the political situation in his home country of South Africa.

The legacy Masekela sowed in New York City during the 1960s remains in the walls of the venues where he played, and in the dust of those that are no longer standing. It's in the records he made in studios and jazz clubs, and on the Manhattan streets where he once posed with a giant stuffed zebra for an album cover. It's a legacy that still lives on in tangible form, too, in the Hugh Masekela Heritage Scholarship at the Manhattan School of Music.

The school is the place where Masekela received his education and met some of the people that would go on to be life-long bandmates and friends, from Larry Willis (who, as the story goes, Masekela convinced to give up opera for piano) to Morris Goldberg, Herbie Hancock and Stewart Levine, "his brother and musical compadre," as Mabusha Masekela, Bra Hugh's nephew says.

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