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Chimamanda Responds: Bookshop Question Was Ironic, Don't Pillory Her

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie says in a post on Facebook that it's unfair to ridicule the French journalist who asked if there are bookshops in Nigeria.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie has responded to the exchange she had with French journalist Caroline Broué on whether Nigeria has bookshops on Facebook.

In a post entitled, "On Bookshops - Not Libraries - in Nigeria," Adichie recounts the exchange how she remembered it and provides her thoughts on the conversation and criticisms that sparked as a result of the clip going viral.

"It appears that 'librairie' was mistakenly translated as 'library' when it actually means 'bookshop,'" she clarifies.


Adichie acknowledges that it's impossible for a French person to know almost everything about Nigeria, as she, herself, doesn't know almost everything about France.

"But to be asked to 'tell French people that you have bookshops in Nigeria because they don't know' is to cater to a wilfully retrograde idea - that Africa is so apart," Adichie continues, "so pathologically 'different,' that a non-African cannot make reasonable assumptions about life there."

Adichie also makes a point to note that Broué was indeed thoughtful and prepared for their conversation, but that particular question had taken her aback.

"I now know that she was trying to be ironic, to enlighten by 'impersonating the ignorant,' but because she had not exhibited any irony until then, I didn't recognize it," she says. "Hers was a genuine, if flat, attempt at irony and I wish she would not be publicly pilloried."

Read the full commentary below. Make sure you don't miss her Lagos bookstore recommendation, too.

(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Ethic's Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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Photo by Monirul Bhuiyan via GettyImages

Former President of Botswana Ian Khama Condemns Zimbabwean Government

Former Botswana President Ian Khama has condemned Zimbabwe's government and joined solidarity with #ZimbabweanLivesMatter.

Former President of Botswana, Ian Khama, has condemned Zimabwe's Zanu PF-led regime in a voice recording broadcasted by eNCA. Khama, known for being outspoken, has critiqued Zimbabwe's violent treatment of journalists and civilians. He voiced out concerns about alleged recent human rights violations which Zimbabwean President Emmerson Mnangagwa continues to deny. The voice recording follows after southern African states' representatives hosted a webinar to critically discuss political affairs in the region.

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J Molley Enlists Costa Titch and Yanga Chief in New Single 'Ang'na Stress' From Upcoming Mixtape

Listen to J Molley's new single 'Ang'na Stress' featuring Costa Titch and Yanga Chief.

In his new single, J Molley expands his scope as he collaborates with artists one wouldn't have predicted. Yanga Chief and Costa Titch spread their sauce on "Ang'na Stress", rapping and singing mostly in South African indigenous languages IsiZulu and IsiXhosa alongside J Molley's English raps.

"Ang'na Stress" is catchy and has mass appeal, it should get decent spins on radio. The song will appear on J Molley's upcoming mixtape All Is Fair In Love & War. The project is the hip-hop artist's first mixtape, and will be a follow-up to his EPs, Dreams Money Can Buy (2017) and Leader of the Wave, a Playlist by J Molley (2018).

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Somali President Replaces Former Prime Minister Ahead of Elections

President Mohamed Abduallahi Mohamed has announced Prime Minister Mohamed Hussein Roble as Somalia's new prime minister ahead of upcoming elections.