#Okay100Women

CHIMAMANDA NGOZI ADICHIE

OkayAfrica's 100 Women celebrates African women who are making waves, shattering ceilings, and uplifting their communities.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is the preeminent figure in African literature. The novelist, short-story writer and public speaker was born in Enugu State, Nigeria and moved to the United States at the age of 19 to attend college. She holds a master’s in Creative Writing from John Hopkins University, as well as a master’s in African Studies from Yale. She’s been awarded a handful of academic fellowships and is the recipient of a MacArthur Genius Grant.




Her first novel, Purple Hibiscus, won the Commonwealth Writer’s Prize for Best Book in 2005. Her second book, Half of a Yellow Sun, won the Orange Prize for fiction—and was adapted into a full-length film in 2015. The New York Times listed her seminal work, Americanah, as one of the 10 best books of 2013 and it also won the National Book Critics Circle Fiction Award. The novel is one of the first to explore identity through a global, African lens.



Adichie is a champion of feminist thought, her TEDx Talk and adapted short-essay, We Should All be Feminists is one of the foremost contemporary works on women’s liberation. Her speeches are mainstays in classrooms, and she is one of the most cherished public intellectuals of our day— fully devoted to disrupting trite Western narratives in order to elevate African voices.



-DD

Audio
(Youtube)

7 Gengetone Acts You Need to Check Out

The streets speak gengetone: Kenya's gengetone sound is reverberating across East Africa and the world, get to know its main purveyors.

Sailors' "Wamlambez!"Wamlambez!" which roughly translates to "those who lick," is the cry the reverberated round the world, pushing the gengetone sound to the global stage. The response "wamnyonyez" roughly translates to "those who suck" and that should tell you all you need to know about the genre.

Known for its lewd lyrics and repetitive (often call and response) hooks, gengetone makes no apologies for belonging to the streets. First of all, most artists that create gengetone are grouped into bands with a few outliers like Zzero Sufuri riding solo. The songs themselves often feature a multiplicity of voices with screams and crowds coming through as ad libs, adding to this idea that this is definitely "outside" music.

Listening to Odi wa Muranga play with his vocal on the track "Thao" it's easy to think that this is the first, but gengetone fits snuggly in a history of sheng rap based on the kapuka style beat. Kapuka is onomatopoeically named, the beats have that repetitive drum-hat-drum skip that sounds like pu-ka-pu-ka-pu. Artists like Nonini were asking women to come over using this riff long before Ochungulo family told them to stay home if they aren't willing to give it up.

Here's seven gengetone groups worth listening to.

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