Arts + Culture

Diaspora Eats: 8 of the Best African Restaurants in Lisbon

This week, we're sharing some of the Best African Restaurant in Lisbon.

DIASPORA—The diaspora is brimming with a variety of restaurants that offer savory dishes that’ll  remind you of mom’s cooking.


In our Diaspora Eats series, we highlight these many eateries, and offer recommendations for the best African food in whichever major city you might find yourself in. 

Whether you’re looking for options to fit your dietary restrictions or you’re simply looking to stuff your face with quality eats, there’s a spot in the city that will cater to your palette. Below are 7 African restaurants to check out while you’re in Lisbon.

Check out some of the best African food in L.AHoustonLondonNew YorkParis, and Washington D.C.AmsterdamToronto and Madrid and Los Angeles

Mwana Pwo

This restaurant located in Parque das Nações transports you to Angola with its tasty Angolan dishes, eye-catching decorations and friendly staff. Be sure to taste their Mufete, grilled fish served with sweet potatoes, banana bread, cooked cassava, and palm oil beans.

Djairsound

This joint on Rua das Janelas Verdes, is the perfect place to catch some live Lusophone music and sample some Cape-Verdean delicacies. Be sure to taste their cachupa, you won't be dissapointed!

Gingolé

Located on Rua Vieira da Silva, this restaurant fuses Angolan and Portuguese cuisine, to your tastebuds' delight! We recommend their calulu de peixe, an Angolan fish and vegetable stew.

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Marginal de Luanda

You will find this buffet style restaurant on R. Latino Coelho. If you're not in the mood for a buffet, you can also sample from the variety of Angolan dishes on their menu.

Ibo

This Mozambican restaurant on Cais do Sodré is as big on design as it is food. Enjoy dishes like crab curry and Zambeziana roasted chicken in a contemporary and chic atmosphere.

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Zambeze

This rooftop restaurant-café on Calçada Marquês de Tancos has one of the best views of the city. On the menu you'll find a blend of Mozambican and Portuguese cuisine like camarão com quiabos e leite de coco and arroz de cabrito com castanhas.

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Cantinho Do Aziz

This eatery on  Rua de São Lourenço offers Mozambican flavour in a convivial atmosphere. Bring your friends and share some Ehopa—a boneless perch of Nile fish cooked in coconut sauce and saffron with prawns and okra, and served with rice. 

Casa da Morna & Semba

Founded by Cape Verdean Singer Tito Paris, this restaurant on Rua Cozinha Económica is celebrated for its cachupa, a slow cooked stew of corn, beans, beef, ribs, chouriço sausage, cassava and savoy cabbage. The restaurant showcases daily live music sets, so you're sure to have a good time!

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Music

6 Samples From 'Éthiopiques' in Hip-Hop

A brief history of Ethio-jazz cultural exchange featuring songs by Nas & Damian Marley, K'naan, Madlib and more.

This article was originally published on OkayAfrica in March, 2017. We're republishing it here for our Crossroads series.

It's 2000 something. I'm holed up in my bedroom searching for samples to chop up on Fruity Loops. While deep into the free-market jungle of Amazon's suggested music section, I stumble across a compilation of Ethiopian music with faded pictures of nine guys jamming in white suit jackets. I press play on the 30 second sample.

My mind races with the opportunities these breakbeats offered a budding beat maker. Catchy organs, swinging horns, funky guitar riffs, soulful melodies and grainy and pained vocalists swoon over love lost and gained. Sung in my mother tongue—Amharic—this was a far cry from the corny synthesizer music of the 1990s that my parents played on Saturday mornings. I could actually sample this shit.

The next day, I burn a CD and pop it into my dad's car. His eyes light up when the first notes ooze out of the speakers. “Where did you get this?" He asks puzzlingly. “The internet," I respond smiling.

In the 1970s my dad was one of thousands of high school students in Addis Ababa protesting the monarchy. The protests eventually created instability which lead to a coup d'état. The monarchy was overthrown and a Marxist styled military junta composed of low ranking officers called the Derg came to power. The new regime subsequently banned music they deemed to be counter revolutionary. When the Derg came into power, Amha Eshete, a pioneering record producer and founder of Ahma Records, fled to the US and the master recordings of his label's tracks somehow ended up in a warehouse in Greece.

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