Arts + Culture

Diaspora Eats: 7 of the Best African Restaurants In Amsterdam

Here are seven of the best African eateries in Amsterdam.

DIASPORA—The diaspora is brimming with a variety of restaurants that offer savory dishes that’ll  remind you of mom’s cooking.


In our Diaspora Eats series, we highlight these many eateries, and offer recommendations for the best African food in whichever major city you might find yourself in. 

Whether you’re looking for options to fit your dietary restrictions or you’re simply looking to stuff your face with quality eats, there’s a spot in the city that will cater to your palette. Below are 7 African restaurants to check out while you’re in Amsterdam.

Check out some of the best African food in Houston, London, New York, Paris, and Washington D.C. 

Restaurant Azmarino

This restaurant, specializes in Ethiopian and Eritrean food and offers an extensive collection of imported beer in a casual and cozy setting.

Lekker verjaardagseten!! #food #foodporn #africanfood #azmarino #amsterdam #depijp #verjaardag #nomnom

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Kilimanjaro Restaurant

Located on Rapenburgerplein, this restaurant offers an array of food from various African regions as well as some exotic meats.  If you're in the mood for some crocodile, Kilimanjaro Restaurant is the place for you.

kilimanjaro yavaş yavaş hazır... #bomontiada #babylonbomomti #babylonkilimanjaro #yerlesiyoruz

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Obalade Suya Restaurant

The name says is all. This restaurant offers everyone's favorite Nigerian snack in both beef and chicken options, along with a plethora of other classics like pepper soup, boiled yam, and beef stew. All the Naija food you need in one stop!

@obaladesuya

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Raïnaraï

This "nomadic" restaurant serves Algerian cuisine in a posh, oaky atmosphere.  The decor alone if enough to keep us satisfied, but the menu—which includes tender lamb and couscous dishes as well as flavorful vegetarian options—is just as wonderful!

 Walia Ibex

Located on Campenstraat, this quaint restaurant is a must stop for delicious Ethiopian cuisine.

Restaurant Du Maroc

This restaurant on Comeniusstraat offers a medley of Morroccan and Western cuisine. Traditional dishes like couscous and tagine are on the menu as well as merguez paninis. You'll be sure to find something to please your tastebuds.

African Kitchen

This Nigerian joint in South East Amsterdam, offers some of the best Nigerian cuisine the city has to offer. Feast on jollof rice or Ghanaian waakye. Did we mention that all dishes come with garri, amala, semovita or pounded yam?

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